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Educación, participación en el mercado de trabajo y bienestar subjetivo: Estudio desde una perspectiva de género

In: Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6

  • Javier Salinas Jimenez

    ()

    (Universidad Complutense)

  • Maria del Mar Salinas Jimenez

    ()

    (Universidad de Extremadura)

  • Joaquin Artes Caselles

    ()

    (Universidad Complutense)

Registered author(s):

    El principal objetivo de este trabajo consiste en analizar si la educación incide en el bienestar subjetivo una vez descontados sus efectos sobre la salud, la renta, la participación en el mercado laboral o el estatus profesional, estudiando si existen diferencias de género en esta relación. De esta forma se pretende estudiar si la educación incide en el bienestar de hombres y mujeres de manera diferenciada, centrándonos también en cómo distintas variables ocupacionales pueden mediar en esa relación y en las diferencias de género existentes en bienestar. Así, teniendo en cuenta que la relación entre educación y bienestar subjetivo puede manifestarse de forma indirecta a través de distintas variables ocupacionales, en este estudio trataremos de controlar el efecto de variables como la participación o no en el mercado de trabajo, el tipo de jornada laboral, o las diferencias en los puestos de trabajo ocupados, a la hora de analizar las diferencias de género en bienestar y su relación con la educación. Finalmente controlamos también por el hecho de que los individuos sean o no el sustentador principal en su hogar, encontrando que las diferencias de género en bienestar tienden a desaparecer cuando consideramos esta variable. Por su parte, los resultados encontrados con relación a la educación sugieren que esta presenta tanto efectos directos como indirectos sobre el bienestar de las mujeres mientras que, en el caso de los hombres, los efectos de la educación sobre su bienestar se manifiestan únicamente de forma indirecta a través de las oportunidades laborales y de estatus profesional que ofrece la educación.

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    This chapter was published in:
  • Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), 2011. "Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación," E-books Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, edition 1, volume 6, number 06, November.
  • This item is provided by Asociación de Economía de la Educación in its series Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6 with number 06-54.
    Handle: RePEc:aec:ieed06:06-54
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.economicsofeducation.com

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    1. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
    2. DiTella, Rafael & MacCulloch, Robert & Oswald, Andrew J., 2001. "Preferences over inflation and unemployment: Evidence from surveys of happiness," ZEI Working Papers B 03-2001, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies, University of Bonn.
    3. Andrew E. Clark, 2003. "Unemployment as a Social Norm: Psychological Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 289-322, April.
    4. Trzcinski, Eileen & Holst, Elke, 2010. "Gender Differences in Subjective Well-Being in and out of Management Positions," IZA Discussion Papers 5116, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Alison L. Booth & Jan C. Van Ours, 2009. "Hours of Work and Gender Identity: Does Part-time Work Make the Family Happier?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 76(301), pages 176-196, 02.
    6. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2007. "Moving Down: Women`s Part-time Work and Occupational Change in Britain 1991-2001," Economics Series Working Papers 359, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Nick Carroll, 2007. "Unemployment and Psychological Well-being," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(262), pages 287-302, 09.
    8. Clark, Andrew E & Oswald, Andrew J, 1994. "Unhappiness and Unemployment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(424), pages 648-59, May.
    9. Chalmers, J. & Hill, T., 2007. "Marginalising Women in the Labour Market: 'Wage Scarring' Effects of Part-time Work," Australian Bulletin of Labour, National Institute of Labour Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 180-201.
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