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Marginalising Women in the Labour Market: 'Wage Scarring' Effects of Part-time Work


  • Chalmers, J.
  • Hill, T.


Australian women are encouraged to use part-time work to alleviate work and family imbalance. Accordingly, part-time work enabling women to maintain attachment to their career, to acquire human capital, and to add to their salaries is integral to a family-friendly society. UK research fi nds that rather than advance careers, part-time work experience is associated with a reduction in earnings. This paper reports on the fi rst Australian attempt to undertake analogous analysis. Using the Negotiating the Life Course data, the only large-sample Australian data set containing information on earnings and part-time and full-time work experience, we fi nd that part-time work experience does not lead to financial rewards in full-time jobs. In fact part-time work generally impinges on wage growth. We advocate for policies that facilitate movement between part-time and full-time hours in the same job, the equivalent treatment of part-time and full-time workers, and family-friendly jobs, regardless of hours worked.

Suggested Citation

  • Chalmers, J. & Hill, T., 2007. "Marginalising Women in the Labour Market: 'Wage Scarring' Effects of Part-time Work," Australian Bulletin of Labour, National Institute of Labour Studies, vol. 33(2), pages 180-201.
  • Handle: RePEc:fli:journl:26191 Note: Chalmers, J., Hill, T., 2007. Marginalising Women in the Labour Market: 'Wage Scarring' Effects of Part-time Work. Australian Bulletin of Labour, Vol. 33 No. 2, pp. 180-201.

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Roberts, Anna M. & Pannell, David J. & Doole, Graeme & Vigiak, Olga, 2012. "Agricultural land management strategies to reduce phosphorus loads in the Gippsland Lakes, Australia," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 11-22.
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    Cited by:

    1. Javier Salinas Jimenez & Maria del Mar Salinas Jimenez & Joaquin Artes Caselles, 2011. "Educación, participación en el mercado de trabajo y bienestar subjetivo: Estudio desde una perspectiva de género," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 6,in: Antonio Caparrós Ruiz (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 6, edition 1, volume 6, chapter 54, pages 882-897 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    2. Jenny Willson & Andy Dickerson, 2010. "Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2010021, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2010.
    3. Mª del Salinas-Jiménez & Joaquín Artés & Javier Salinas-Jiménez, 2013. "How Do Educational Attainment and Occupational and Wage-Earner Statuses Affect Life Satisfaction? A Gender Perspective Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 367-388, April.
    4. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2009. "Accommodating Families," Chapters,in: Labor and Employment Law and Economics, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2009. "Accommodating Families," Chapters,in: Labor and Employment Law and Economics, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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