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Karine van der Beek

Personal Details

First Name:Karine
Middle Name:
Last Name:van der Beek
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pva759
http://www.bgu.ac.il/~kvdbeek/

Affiliation

Economics Department
Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Beer-Sheva, Israel
http://www.bgu.ac.il/econ/

: +972-8-647-2268
+972-8-647-2941
P.O.B 653, Beer-Sheva 8410501
RePEc:edi:edbguil (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Karine van der Beek & Moshe Justman, 2013. "Market Forces Shaping Human Capital in Eighteenth Century London," Working Papers 2013-014, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  2. Karine van der Beek, "undated". "England's Eighteenth Century Demand for High-Quality Workmanship: Evidence from Apprenticeship, 1710-1770," Working Papers 2013-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

Articles

  1. Zeev, Nadav Ben & Mokyr, Joel & van der Beek, Karine, 2017. "Flexible Supply of Apprenticeship in the British Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 208-250, March.
  2. Feldman, Naomi E. & van der Beek, Karine, 2016. "Skill choice and skill complementarity in eighteenth century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 94-113.
  3. Karine Van Der Beek, 2010. "Political fragmentation, competition, and investment decisions: the medieval grinding industry in Ponthieu, France, 1150–1250," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(3), pages 664-687, August.
  4. van der Beek, Karine, 2009. "The Rise of the Amsterdam Market and Information Exchange: Merchants, Commercial Expansion, and Change in the Spatial Economy of the Low Countries, c. 15501630. By Clè Lesger. Burlington, VT: Ashgate,," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 882-883, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Karine van der Beek & Moshe Justman, 2013. "Market Forces Shaping Human Capital in Eighteenth Century London," Working Papers 2013-014, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Karine van der Beek, "undated". "England's Eighteenth Century Demand for High-Quality Workmanship: Evidence from Apprenticeship, 1710-1770," Working Papers 2013-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Florian Brugger & Christian Gehrke, 2017. "Skilling and Deskilling Technological Change in Classical Economic Theory and Its Empirical Evidence," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2017-02, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.

  2. Karine van der Beek, "undated". "England's Eighteenth Century Demand for High-Quality Workmanship: Evidence from Apprenticeship, 1710-1770," Working Papers 2013-015, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2014. "Did Science Cause the Industrial Revolution?," Working Papers 201414, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    2. de Pleijt, Alexandra & Nuvolari, Alessandro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2018. "Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines," CEPR Discussion Papers 12987, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Alexandra M. de Pleijt & Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2017. "Human capital formation from occupations: the ‘deskilling hypothesis’ revisited," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 11(1), pages 1-30, January.
    4. Francesco Cinnirella & Jochen Streb, 2017. "The role of human capital and innovation in economic development: evidence from post-Malthusian Prussia," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 193-227, June.
    5. Kevin O’Rourke & Ahmed Rahman & Alan Taylor, 2013. "Luddites, the industrial revolution, and the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 373-409, December.

Articles

  1. Zeev, Nadav Ben & Mokyr, Joel & van der Beek, Karine, 2017. "Flexible Supply of Apprenticeship in the British Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 208-250, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Pencho Penchev, 2017. "Of the Essence and Meaning of Economic History," Proceedings of the Centre for Economic History Research, Centre for Economic History Research, vol. 2, pages 9-34, November.
    2. Claude Diebolt & Charlotte Le Chapelain & Audrey Rose Menard, 2019. "Neither the elite, nor the mass. The rise of intermediate human capital during the French industrialization process," Working Papers 04-19, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    3. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2018. "Notes on Guilds on the Eve of the French Revoloution," Working Papers 201804, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    4. Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat, 2018. "Two stories, one fate: Age-heaping and literacy in Spain, 1877-1930," Working Papers 0139, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    5. William F. Maloney & Felipe Valencia Caicedo, 2017. "Engineering Growth: Innovative Capacity and Development in the Americas," CESifo Working Paper Series 6339, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. David de la Croix & Matthias Doepke & Joel Mokyr, 2016. "Clans, Guilds, and Markets: Apprenticeship Institutions and Growth in the Pre-Industrial Economy," Working Papers 2016-008, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. de Pleijt, Alexandra & Nuvolari, Alessandro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2018. "Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines," CEPR Discussion Papers 12987, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Matthias Doepke & Joel Mokyr & David de la Croix, 2013. "Apprenticeship and Technological Progress in the Malthusian World," 2013 Meeting Papers 76, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Èric Gómez-i-Aznar, 2019. "Human capital at the beginnings of the 18th century Catalonia: age-heaping and numeracy in a changing economy," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1904, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    10. James Harrigan & Ariell Reshef & Farid Toubal, 2018. "Techies, Trade, and Skill-Biased Productivity," NBER Working Papers 25295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Feldman, Naomi E. & van der Beek, Karine, 2016. "Skill choice and skill complementarity in eighteenth century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 94-113.

    Cited by:

    1. B. Zorina Khan, 2018. "Human capital, knowledge and economic development: evidence from the British Industrial Revolution, 1750–1930," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 12(2), pages 313-341, May.
    2. Claude Diebolt & Charlotte Le Chapelain & Audrey-Rose Menard, 2017. "Industrialization as a Deskilling Process? Steam Engines and Human Capital in XIXth Century France," Working Papers 07-17, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    3. Claude Diebolt & Charlotte Le Chapelain & Audrey Rose Menard, 2018. "Learning outside the factory: the impact of technological change on the rise of adult education in nineteenth-century France," Working Papers of BETA 2018-13, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    4. Moshe Justman & Karine Beek, 2015. "Market forces shaping human capital in eighteenth-century London," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(4), pages 1177-1202, November.
    5. de Pleijt, Alexandra & Nuvolari, Alessandro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2018. "Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines," CEPR Discussion Papers 12987, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Katz‬‏, ‪Ori, 2018. "Railroads, Economic Development, and the Demographic Transition in the United States," MPRA Paper 88869, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Francesco Cinnirella & Jochen Streb, 2017. "The role of human capital and innovation in economic development: evidence from post-Malthusian Prussia," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 193-227, June.
    8. Florian Brugger & Christian Gehrke, 2017. "Skilling and Deskilling Technological Change in Classical Economic Theory and Its Empirical Evidence," Working Paper Series, Social and Economic Sciences 2017-02, Faculty of Social and Economic Sciences, Karl-Franzens-University Graz.
    9. Adrien Montalbo, 2018. "Industrial activities and primary schooling in early nineteenth-century France," PSE Working Papers halshs-01826346, HAL.
    10. Philips, Robin C. M. & Földvàri, Péter & Van Leeuwen, Bas, 2017. "Drivers of industrialisation: intersectoral evidence from the Low Countries in the nineteenth century," MPRA Paper 83304, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (4) 2013-08-31 2013-11-02 2013-11-02 2013-12-06
  2. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (1) 2013-08-31

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