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Stephen Tapp

Personal Details

First Name:Stephen
Middle Name:
Last Name:Tapp
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pta221
https://sites.google.com/site/stephentappweb/
Twitter: @stephen_tapp
Terminal Degree:2008 Economics Department; Queen's University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

(99%) Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP)

Montréal, Canada
http://www.irpp.org/

(514) 985-2461
(514) 985-2559
1470 Peel Street, suite 200, Montréal, Québec, H3A 1T1
RePEc:edi:irpppca (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Economics Department
Queen's University

Kingston, Canada
http://www.econ.queensu.ca/

(613) 533-2250
(613) 533-6668
Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6
RePEc:edi:qedquca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Stephen Tapp, 2007. "The Dynamics Of Sectoral Labour Adjustment," Working Paper 1141, Economics Department, Queen's University.
  2. Stephen Tapp, 2007. "Lost In Transition: The Costs And Consequences Of Sectoral Labour Adjustment," Working Paper 1142, Economics Department, Queen's University.

    repec:ags:quedwp:273618 is not listed on IDEAS
    repec:ags:quedwp:273617 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Haizhen Mou & Michael M. Atkinson & Stephen Tapp, 2018. "Do Balanced Budget Laws Matter in Recessions?," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 28-46, March.
  2. Stephen Tapp, 2013. "The Use and Effectiveness of Fiscal Rules in Canadian Provinces," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(1), pages 45-70, March.
  3. Stephen Tapp, 2011. "Lost in transition: the costs and consequences of sectoral labour adjustment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1264-1296, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Stephen Tapp, 2007. "Lost In Transition: The Costs And Consequences Of Sectoral Labour Adjustment," Working Paper 1142, Economics Department, Queen's University.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Labour market flows revisited
      by Stephen Gordon in Worthwhile Canadian Initiative on 2015-10-16 05:56:42

Working papers

  1. Stephen Tapp, 2007. "The Dynamics Of Sectoral Labour Adjustment," Working Paper 1141, Economics Department, Queen's University.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Tapp, 2011. "Lost in transition: the costs and consequences of sectoral labour adjustment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1264-1296, November.
    2. Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2011. "Sector-specific productivity shocks in a matching model," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 2674-2682.
    3. Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2015. "Sectoral labor market effects of fiscal spending," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 19-35.
    4. Giovanni Gallipoli & Gianluigi Pelloni, 2013. "Macroeconomic Effects of Job Reallocations: A Survey," Review of Economic Analysis, Digital Initiatives at the University of Waterloo Library, vol. 5(2), pages 127-176, December.
    5. Peter Howie & Zauresh Atakhanova, 2020. "Heterogeneous labor and structural change in low- and middle-income, resource-dependent countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 297-332, May.
    6. Alexiadis, Stilianos & Eleftheriou, Konstantinos & Nijkamp, Peter, 2013. "Technology adoption within a search model: Evidence from OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 137-148.

  2. Stephen Tapp, 2007. "Lost In Transition: The Costs And Consequences Of Sectoral Labour Adjustment," Working Paper 1142, Economics Department, Queen's University.

    Cited by:

    1. Simona E. Cociuba & James C. MacGee, 2018. "Demographics and Sectoral Reallocations: A Search Theory with Immobile Workers," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20182, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    2. Zhang, Yahong, 2018. "Unemployment fluctuations in a small open-economy model with segmented labour markets: The case of Canada," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 6-20.
    3. Dorothee Flaig & Harald Grethe & Scott McDonald & Khalid Siddig, 2012. "Intersectoral factor movements: do adjustment costs matter for welfare?," EcoMod2012 4418, EcoMod.
    4. Peter Howie & Zauresh Atakhanova, 2020. "Heterogeneous labor and structural change in low- and middle-income, resource-dependent countries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 53(2), pages 297-332, May.

Articles

  1. Haizhen Mou & Michael M. Atkinson & Stephen Tapp, 2018. "Do Balanced Budget Laws Matter in Recessions?," Public Budgeting & Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(1), pages 28-46, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Guoxing & Deng, Nana & Mou, Haizhen & Zhang, Zhe George & Chen, Xiaofeng, 2019. "The impact of the policy and behavior of public participation on environmental governance performance: Empirical analysis based on provincial panel data in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 1347-1354.

  2. Stephen Tapp, 2013. "The Use and Effectiveness of Fiscal Rules in Canadian Provinces," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(1), pages 45-70, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Picchio, Matteo & Santolini, Raffaella, 2020. "Fiscal rules and budget forecast errors of Italian municipalities," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    2. Stephen McBride, 2016. "Constitutionalizing Austerity: Taking the Public out of Public Policy," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(1), pages 5-14, February.
    3. Melville McMillan, 2019. "Provincial Public Infrastructure Spending and Financing in Alberta: Searching for a Better Course," SPP Research Papers, The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary, vol. 12(10), March.
    4. Étienne Farvaque & Martial Foucault & Marcelin Joanis, 2015. "L’endettement public des provinces canadiennes : Les règles d’équilibre budgétaire sont-elles efficaces?," CIRANO Working Papers 2015s-10, CIRANO.
    5. Heinemann, Friedrich & Moessinger, Marc-Daniel & Yeter, Mustafa, 2018. "Do fiscal rules constrain fiscal policy? A meta-regression-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 69-92.
    6. Heiko T. Burret & Lars P. Feld, 2016. "Effects of Fiscal Rules - 85 Years' Experience in Switzerland," CESifo Working Paper Series 6063, CESifo.
    7. Burret, Heiko T. & Feld, Lars P., 2018. "(Un-)intended effects of fiscal rules," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 166-191.

  3. Stephen Tapp, 2011. "Lost in transition: the costs and consequences of sectoral labour adjustment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1264-1296, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2007-11-24 2007-11-24
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2007-11-24 2007-11-24
  3. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2007-11-24 2007-11-24

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