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James Scott

Personal Details

First Name:James
Middle Name:
Last Name:Scott
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psc771

Affiliation

Department of Political Economy
King's College London

London, United Kingdom
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/politicaleconomy/

:

22 Kingsway, First Floor, London WC2B 6NR
RePEc:edi:dekcluk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Rorden Wilkinson & Erin Hannah & James Scott, 2014. "The WTO in Bali - What MC9 means for the Doha Development Agenda and why it matters?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 19414, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  2. James Scott, 2012. "Squeezing the state: tariff revenue, state capacity and the WTO’s Doha Round," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16912, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  3. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2012. "Changing of the guard: expert knowledge and ‘common sense’ in the Doha Development Agenda," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16612, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  4. Mark Langan & James Scott, 2011. "The false promise of Aid for Trade," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16011, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  5. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2010. "What have the poorest countries to gain from the Doha Development Agenda (DDA)?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13210, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  6. James Scott & Matthias vom Hau & David Hulme, 2010. "Beyond the BICs: identifying the ‘emerging middle powers’ and understanding their role in global poverty reduction," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13710, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  7. James Scott, 2010. "South-South trade and North-South politics: Emerging powers and the reconfiguration of global governance," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13110, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  8. David Hulme & James Scott, 2010. "The Political Economy of the MDGs: Retrospect and Prospect for the World's Biggest Promise," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 11010, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  9. James Scott, 2009. "Developing Countries in the ITO and GATT Negotiations," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 9509, GDI, The University of Manchester.
  10. Armando Barrientos & James Scott, 2008. "Social Transfers and Growth: A Review," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 5208, GDI, The University of Manchester.

Articles

  1. Hannah, Erin & Scott, James & Wilkinson, Rorden, 2017. "Reforming WTO-Civil Society Engagement," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 427-448, July.
  2. Erin Hannah & Holly Ryan & James Scott, 2017. "Power, knowledge and resistance: between co-optation and revolution in global trade," Review of International Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 741-775, September.
  3. Rorden Wilkinson & Erin Hannah & James Scott, 2016. "The WTO in Nairobi: The Demise of the Doha Development Agenda and the Future of the Multilateral Trading System," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(2), pages 247-255, May.
  4. James Scott, 2015. "The Role of Southern Intellectuals in Contemporary Trade Governance," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 633-652, October.
  5. Matthias vom Hau & James Scott & David Hulme, 2012. "Beyond the BRICs: Alternative Strategies of Influence in the Global Politics of Development," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 24(2), pages 187-204, April.
  6. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2010. "What Happened to Doha in Geneva? Re-engineering the WTO's Image While Missing Key Opportunities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 22(2), pages 141-153, April.
  7. Wilkinson, Rorden & Scott, James, 2008. "Developing country participation in the GATT: a reassessment," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 473-510, July.
  8. James Scott, 2001. "Does UK defence spending crowd-out UK private sector investment?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 325-336.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Rorden Wilkinson & Erin Hannah & James Scott, 2014. "The WTO in Bali - What MC9 means for the Doha Development Agenda and why it matters?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 19414, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Flentø, Daniel & Ponte, Stefano, 2017. "Least-Developed Countries in a World of Global Value Chains: Are WTO Trade Negotiations Helping?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 366-374.
    2. Erin Hannah & James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2018. "The WTO in Buenos Aires: The outcome and its significance for the future of the multilateral trading system," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(10), pages 2578-2598, October.
    3. Rorden Wilkinson & Erin Hannah & James Scott, 2016. "The WTO in Nairobi: The Demise of the Doha Development Agenda and the Future of the Multilateral Trading System," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(2), pages 247-255, May.

  2. Mark Langan & James Scott, 2011. "The false promise of Aid for Trade," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16011, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Frederick Mayer & William Milberg, 2013. "Aid for Trade in a world of global value chains: chain power, the distribution of rents and implications for the form of aid," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series ctg-2013-34, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Temesgen Worku & Juan P. Mendoza & Jacco L. Wielhouwer, 2016. "Tariff evasion in sub-Saharan Africa: the influence of corruption in importing and exporting countries," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(4), pages 741-761, August.
    3. James Scott, 2012. "Squeezing the state: tariff revenue, state capacity and the WTO’s Doha Round," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16912, GDI, The University of Manchester.

  3. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2010. "What have the poorest countries to gain from the Doha Development Agenda (DDA)?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13210, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Draper, Peter & Freytag, Andreas & Al Doyaili, Sarah, 2012. "Why should sub-Saharan Africa care about the Doha development round?," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-67, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Mark Langan & James Scott, 2011. "The false promise of Aid for Trade," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16011, GDI, The University of Manchester.

  4. James Scott & Matthias vom Hau & David Hulme, 2010. "Beyond the BICs: identifying the ‘emerging middle powers’ and understanding their role in global poverty reduction," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 13710, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Cheryl McEwan & Emma Mawdsley, 2012. "Trilateral Development Cooperation: Power and Politics in Emerging Aid Relationships," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 43(6), pages 1185-1209, November.

  5. David Hulme & James Scott, 2010. "The Political Economy of the MDGs: Retrospect and Prospect for the World's Biggest Promise," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 11010, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Amanda Lenhardt & Andrew Shepherd, 2013. "What has happened to the poorest 50%?," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 18413, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Meg Elkins & Simon Feeny & David Prentice, 2015. "Do Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers reduce poverty and improve well-being?," Discussion Papers 15/02, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.

  6. Armando Barrientos & James Scott, 2008. "Social Transfers and Growth: A Review," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 5208, GDI, The University of Manchester.

    Cited by:

    1. Mideros Mora, Andres & Gassmann, Franziska, 2017. "Fostering social mobility: The case of the 'Bono de Desarrollo Humano' in Ecuador," MERIT Working Papers 002, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Franziska Gassmann & Cecile Cherrier & Andrés Mideros Mora & Pierre Mohnen, 2013. "Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia," Papers inwopa694, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Villa, Juan M., 2014. "Social transfers and growth: The missing evidence from luminosity data," WIDER Working Paper Series 090, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. Bishop, Sylvia & Shepherd, Andrew, 2013. "Aid and Poverty: Why Does Aid Not Address Poverty (Much)?," WIDER Working Paper Series 020, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Gentilini, Ugo & Omamo, Steven Were, 2011. "Social protection 2.0: Exploring issues, evidence and debates in a globalizing world," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 329-340, June.
    6. Mideros A. & Gassmann F. & Mohnen P., 2013. "Estimation of rates of return of social protection instruments. Making the case for non-contributory social transfers in Cambodia," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    7. Burger, Rulof & von Fintel, Dieter & Grün, Carola, 2010. "The nexus between social grants and participation rates: Dynamics across generations in the South African labour market," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 26, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    8. Mideros, A. & O'Donoghue, C., 2014. "The effect of unconditional cash transfers on adult labour supply: A unitary discrete choice model for the case of Ecuador," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

Articles

  1. Hannah, Erin & Scott, James & Wilkinson, Rorden, 2017. "Reforming WTO-Civil Society Engagement," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 427-448, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Erin Hannah & James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2018. "The WTO in Buenos Aires: The outcome and its significance for the future of the multilateral trading system," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(10), pages 2578-2598, October.

  2. Rorden Wilkinson & Erin Hannah & James Scott, 2016. "The WTO in Nairobi: The Demise of the Doha Development Agenda and the Future of the Multilateral Trading System," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(2), pages 247-255, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Flentø, Daniel & Ponte, Stefano, 2017. "Least-Developed Countries in a World of Global Value Chains: Are WTO Trade Negotiations Helping?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 366-374.
    2. Erin Hannah & James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2018. "The WTO in Buenos Aires: The outcome and its significance for the future of the multilateral trading system," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(10), pages 2578-2598, October.
    3. Stephen, Matthew & Parízek, Michal, 2019. "New Powers and the Distribution of Preferences in Global Trade Governance: From Deadlock and Drift to Fragmentation," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 735-758.

  3. Matthias vom Hau & James Scott & David Hulme, 2012. "Beyond the BRICs: Alternative Strategies of Influence in the Global Politics of Development," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 24(2), pages 187-204, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Joren Verschaeve & Jan Orbie, 2016. "The DAC is Dead, Long Live the DCF? A Comparative Analysis of the OECD Development Assistance Committee and the UN Development Cooperation Forum," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 28(4), pages 571-587, September.
    2. Sandra H Bry, 2017. "The Evolution of South-South Development Cooperation: Guiding Principles and Approaches," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(1), pages 160-175, January.
    3. Matthias vom Hau, 2012. "State capacity and inclusive development: new challenges and directions," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-002-12, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    4. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2012. "Changing of the guard: expert knowledge and ‘common sense’ in the Doha Development Agenda," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16612, GDI, The University of Manchester.

  4. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2010. "What Happened to Doha in Geneva? Re-engineering the WTO's Image While Missing Key Opportunities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 22(2), pages 141-153, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Charalampos Efstathopoulos, 2016. "Reformist Multipolarity and Global Trade Governance in an Era of Systemic Power Redistribution," Global Journal of Emerging Market Economies, Emerging Markets Forum, vol. 8(1), pages 3-21, January.
    2. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2012. "Changing of the guard: expert knowledge and ‘common sense’ in the Doha Development Agenda," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16612, GDI, The University of Manchester.

  5. Wilkinson, Rorden & Scott, James, 2008. "Developing country participation in the GATT: a reassessment," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(3), pages 473-510, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Joanne Gowa & Raymond Hicks, 2012. "The most-favored nation rule in principle and practice: Discrimination in the GATT," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 247-266, September.
    2. Christie, Andrew, 2009. "Special and Differential Treatment in the GATT: A Pyrrhic Victory for Developing Countries," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 10(2), pages 1-22.
    3. James Scott & Rorden Wilkinson, 2012. "Changing of the guard: expert knowledge and ‘common sense’ in the Doha Development Agenda," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series 16612, GDI, The University of Manchester.

  6. James Scott, 2001. "Does UK defence spending crowd-out UK private sector investment?," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 325-336.

    Cited by:

    1. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Expenditure and Investment in OECD Countries: Revisited," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(4), pages 1-10, December.
    2. McDonald Bruce D & Eger Robert J, 2010. "The Defense-Growth Relationship: An Economic Investigation into Post-Soviet States," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-28, September.
    3. Hou Na & Chen Bo, 2014. "Military Spending and Economic Growth in An Augmented Solow Model: A Panel Data Investigation for OECD Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 20(3), pages 1-15, August.
    4. Gülbahar ÜÇLER, 2016. "Testing the relationship between military spending and private investments: Evidence from Turkey," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(3(608), A), pages 307-318, Autumn.
    5. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2019. "Military spending, economic growth and investment: a disaggregated analysis by income group," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(3), pages 935-958, March.
    6. Malizard, Julien, 2015. "Does military expenditure crowd out private investment? A disaggregated perspective for the case of France," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 44-52.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (4) 2010-04-24 2010-11-06 2012-01-18 2014-06-14
  2. NEP-ACC: Accounting & Auditing (1) 2012-06-05
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2010-11-06
  4. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2012-01-18
  5. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2009-10-24
  6. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2014-06-14
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2012-06-05
  8. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2010-04-24

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