IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bwp/bwppap/11010.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Political Economy of the MDGs: Retrospect and Prospect for the World's Biggest Promise

Author

Listed:
  • David Hulme
  • James Scott

Abstract

In September 2010 world leaders will meet in New York to discuss progress in meeting the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which include the promise of halving ‘extreme poverty’ between 1990 and 2015. The paper begins with a brief history of how the MDGs came into being (See Table 1 for a list and other details), noting that they were primarily a product of the rich world, before looking at the progress made in achieving them and the degree to which the rich countries have lived up to the promises they made as part of Goal 8. The final section draws lessons from the MDG process to feed into the debate concerning what will take their place in 2015 when they come to an end.

Suggested Citation

  • David Hulme & James Scott, 2010. "The Political Economy of the MDGs: Retrospect and Prospect for the World's Biggest Promise," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 11010, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:11010
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hummedia.manchester.ac.uk/institutes/gdi/publications/workingpapers/bwpi/bwpi-wp-11010.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jan Vandemoortele, 2009. "The MDG Conundrum: Meeting the Targets Without Missing the Point," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 27(4), pages 355-371, July.
    2. Clemens, Michael A. & Kenny, Charles J. & Moss, Todd J., 2007. "The Trouble with the MDGs: Confronting Expectations of Aid and Development Success," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 735-751, May.
    3. Finnemore, Martha & Sikkink, Kathryn, 1998. "International Norm Dynamics and Political Change," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(04), pages 887-917, September.
    4. David Hulme & Sakiko Fukuda-Parr, 2009. "International Norm Dynamics and ‘the End of Poverty’: Understanding the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 9609, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    5. Geske Dijkstra, 2005. "The PRSP Approach and the Illusion of Improved Aid Effectiveness: Lessons from Bolivia, Honduras and Nicaragua," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 23(4), pages 443-464, July.
    6. Thomas Pogge, 2004. "The First United Nations Millennium Development Goal: A cause for celebration?," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 377-397.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Amanda Lenhardt & Andrew Shepherd, 2013. "What has happened to the poorest 50%?," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 18413, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    2. Meg Elkins & Simon Feeny & David Prentice, 2015. "Do Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers reduce poverty and improve well-being?," Discussion Papers 15/02, University of Nottingham, School of Economics.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:11010. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rowena Harding). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wpmanuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.