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Laurent Mathevet

Personal Details

First Name:Laurent
Middle Name:
Last Name:Mathevet
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma696
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.hss.caltech.edu/~lmath
(626)-395-3897
Terminal Degree:2008 Division of Social Sciences; California Institute of Technology (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Texas-Austin

Austin, Texas (United States)
http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/economics/

: +1 (512) 471-3211
+1 (512) 471-3510
Austin, Texas 78712
RePEc:edi:deutxus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Laurent Mathevet & Jakub Steiner, 2012. "Sand in the Wheels: A Dynamic Global-Game Approach," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp459, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
  2. Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," MPRA Paper 36032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Mathevet, Laurent, 2007. "Supermodular Bayesian implementation: Learning and incentive design," Working Papers 1265, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  4. Jackson, Matthew O. & Mathevet, Laurent & Mattes, Kyle, "undated". "Nomination processes and policy outcomes," Working Papers 1250, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  5. Mathevet, Laurent, "undated". "A contraction principle for finite global games," Working Papers 1243, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Articles

  1. Ron Borkovsky & Paul Ellickson & Brett Gordon & Victor Aguirregabiria & Pedro Gardete & Paul Grieco & Todd Gureckis & Teck-Hua Ho & Laurent Mathevet & Andrew Sweeting, 2015. "Multiplicity of equilibria and information structures in empirical games: challenges and prospects," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 115-125, June.
  2. Mathevet, Laurent, 2014. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 252-271.
  3. Mathevet, Laurent & Steiner, Jakub, 2013. "Tractable dynamic global games and applications," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(6), pages 2583-2619.
  4. Mathevet, Laurent & Taneva, Ina, 2013. "Finite supermodular design with interdependent valuations," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 327-349.
  5. Healy, Paul J. & Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Designing stable mechanisms for economic environments," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(3), September.
  6. Mathevet, Laurent A., 2010. "Supermodular mechanism design," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5(3), September.
  7. Laurent Mathevet, 2010. "A contraction principle for finite global games," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 42(3), pages 539-563, March.
  8. Jackson, Matthew O. & Mathevet, Laurent & Mattes, Kyle, 2007. "Nomination Processes and Policy Outcomes," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 2(1), pages 67-92, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Laurent Mathevet & Jakub Steiner, 2012. "Sand in the Wheels: A Dynamic Global-Game Approach," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp459, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.

    Cited by:

    1. Eugen Kovac & Jakub Steiner, 2008. "Reversibility in Dynamic Coordination Problems," ESE Discussion Papers 183, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    2. Lavička, H. & Lichard, T. & Novotný, J., 2016. "Sand in the wheels or wheels in the sand? Tobin taxes and market crashes," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 328-342.

  2. Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," MPRA Paper 36032, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Wolfgang Kuhle, 2013. "A Global Game with Heterogenous Priors," Papers 1312.7860, arXiv.org.
    2. Mathevet, Laurent & Taneva, Ina, 2013. "Finite supermodular design with interdependent valuations," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 327-349.
    3. Wolfgang Kuhle, 2016. "A global game with heterogenous priors," Economic Theory Bulletin, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 4(2), pages 167-185, October.
    4. Alan Beggs, 2012. "Dependence and Uniqueness in Bayesian Games," Economics Series Working Papers 603, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

  3. Jackson, Matthew O. & Mathevet, Laurent & Mattes, Kyle, "undated". "Nomination processes and policy outcomes," Working Papers 1250, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

    Cited by:

    1. Mattozzi, Andrea & Merlo, Antonio, 2014. "Mediocracy," Working Papers 14-002, Rice University, Department of Economics.
    2. Hummel, Patrick, 2013. "Candidate strategies in primaries and general elections with candidates of heterogeneous quality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 85-102.
    3. Agnes Pinter & Robert F. Veszteg, 2008. "Minority vs. Majority: An Experimental Study of Standardized Bids," ISER Discussion Paper 0708, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    4. Rafael Hortala-Vallve & Hannes Mueller, 2010. "Primaries: The Unifying Force," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 843.10, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    5. Epple, Dennis & Romano, Richard, 2014. "On the political economy of educational vouchers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 62-73.
    6. Bernard Grofman & Orestis Troumpounis & Dimitrios Xefteris, 2016. "Electoral competition with primaries and quality asymmetries," Working Papers 135286117, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    7. Zudenkova, Galina, 2012. "A rationale for intra-party democracy," MPRA Paper 39091, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Amorós, P. & Martínez, Ricardo & Puy, M. Socorro, 2013. "The closed primaries versus the top-two primary," UC3M Working papers. Economics we1319, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    9. Mohammad Mirhosseini, 2015. "Primaries with strategic voters: trading off electability and ideology," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(3), pages 457-471, March.
    10. Hummel, Patrick, 2010. "Flip-flopping from primaries to general elections," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 1020-1027, December.
    11. Fernando Aragon, 2012. "Party Nomination Procedures and Quality of Government," Discussion Papers dp12-10, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    12. Motz, Nicolas, 2012. "Who emerges from smoke-filled rooms? Political parties and candidate selection," MPRA Paper 44462, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2013.
    13. James Adams & Samuel Merrill, 2014. "Candidates’ policy strategies in primary elections: does strategic voting by the primary electorate matter?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(1), pages 7-24, July.
    14. Pablo Amorós & M. Socorro Puy & Ricardo Martínez, 2016. "Closed primaries versus top-two primaries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 167(1), pages 21-35, April.
    15. Fernando Aragón, 2014. "Why do parties use primaries?: Political selection versus candidate incentives," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(1), pages 205-225, July.
    16. Fernando Aragon, 2009. "Candidate nomination procedures andpolitical selection: evidence from LatinAmerican parties," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 003, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    17. Andrea Mattozzi & Antonio Merlo, 2011. "Mediocracy, Fourth Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 13-010, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 08 Feb 2013.
    18. Evrenk, Haldun & Lambie-Hanson, Timothy & Xu, Yourong, 2013. "Party-bosses vs. party-primaries: Quality of legislature under different selectorates," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 168-182.

  4. Mathevet, Laurent, "undated". "A contraction principle for finite global games," Working Papers 1243, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

    Cited by:

    1. Junichi Fujimoto, 2011. "Speculative Attacks with Multiple Targets," CARF F-Series CARF-F-267, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    2. Morris, Stephen & Shin, Hyun Song & Yildiz, Muhamet, 2016. "Common belief foundations of global games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 826-848.
    3. Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," MPRA Paper 36032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Bernardo Guimaraes & Stephen Morris, 2005. "Risk and Wealth in a Model of Self-Fulfilling Currency Attacks," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000000790, UCLA Department of Economics.
    5. Stephen Morris & Ming Yang, 2016. "Coordination and Continuous Choice," Working Papers 087_2017, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
    6. Alan Beggs, 2012. "Dependence and Uniqueness in Bayesian Games," Economics Series Working Papers 603, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    7. Angeletos, G.-M. & Lian, C., 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    8. George-Marios Angeletos & Chen Lian, 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics: Accommodating Frictions in Coordination," NBER Working Papers 22297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Beggs, A.W., 2015. "Regularity and robustness in monotone Bayesian games," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 145-158.
    10. Alan Beggs & A.W. Beggs, 2011. "Regularity and Stability in Monotone Bayesian Games," Economics Series Working Papers 587, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Ron Borkovsky & Paul Ellickson & Brett Gordon & Victor Aguirregabiria & Pedro Gardete & Paul Grieco & Todd Gureckis & Teck-Hua Ho & Laurent Mathevet & Andrew Sweeting, 2015. "Multiplicity of equilibria and information structures in empirical games: challenges and prospects," Marketing Letters, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 115-125, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Pavel Kireyev, 2016. "Markets for Ideas: Prize Structure, Entry Limits, and the Design of Ideation Contests," Harvard Business School Working Papers 16-129, Harvard Business School.
    2. Sanchez Villalba, Miguel, 2015. "Global inspection games," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 59-72.

  2. Mathevet, Laurent, 2014. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 252-271.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mathevet, Laurent & Steiner, Jakub, 2013. "Tractable dynamic global games and applications," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(6), pages 2583-2619.

    Cited by:

    1. Araujo, Luis & Guimarães, Bernardo, 2013. "The effect of options on coordination," CEPR Discussion Papers 9294, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Mathieu Taschereau-Dumouchel & Edouard Schaal, 2015. "Coordinating Business Cycles," 2015 Meeting Papers 178, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Araujo, Luis & Guimaraes, Bernardo, 2015. "Intertemporal coordination with delay options," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 793-810.
    4. Stephen Morris & Ming Yang, 2016. "Coordination and Continuous Choice," Working Papers 087_2017, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Econometric Research Program..
    5. Zhen Zhou & Deepal Basak, 2015. "Diffusing Coordination Risk," 2015 Meeting Papers 1350, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Angeletos, G.-M. & Lian, C., 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    7. George-Marios Angeletos & Chen Lian, 2016. "Incomplete Information in Macroeconomics: Accommodating Frictions in Coordination," NBER Working Papers 22297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Szkup, Michal, 2017. "Multiplier effect and comparative statics in global games of regime change," MPRA Paper 82729, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Guimaraes, Bernardo & Machado, Caio & Pereira, Ana Elisa, 2017. "Dynamic coordination with timing frictions: theory and applications," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86149, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  4. Healy, Paul J. & Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Designing stable mechanisms for economic environments," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(3), September.

    Cited by:

    1. Masuda, Takehito & Okano, Yoshitaka & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi, 2014. "The minimum approval mechanism implements the efficient public good allocation theoretically and experimentally," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 73-85.
    2. Healy, Paul J. & Jain, Ritesh, 2017. "Generalized Groves–Ledyard mechanisms," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 204-217.
    3. Reischmann, Andreas, 2016. "Conditional Contribution Mechanisms for the Provision of Public Goods in Dynamic Settings - Theory and Experimental Evidence," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145613, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Van Essen, Matthew & Walker, Mark, 2017. "A simple market-like allocation mechanism for public goods," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 6-19.
    5. Meng, Dawen & Tian, Guoqiang, 2013. "Entry-Deterring Nonlinear Pricing with Bounded Rationality," MPRA Paper 57935, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised May 2014.
    6. Arifovic, Jasmina & Ledyard, John, 2011. "A behavioral model for mechanism design: Individual evolutionary learning," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 78(3), pages 374-395, May.
    7. Matt Essen, 2014. "A Clarke tax tâtonnement that converges to the Lindahl allocation," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 43(2), pages 309-327, August.
    8. Matt Van Essen, 2015. "Bartering Games in the Kolm Triangle," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(3), pages 297-310, June.
    9. Matt Van Essen, 2012. "A note on the stability of Chen’s Lindahl mechanism," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 38(2), pages 365-370, February.
    10. Matt Van Essen, 2012. "Information complexity, punishment, and stability in two Nash efficient Lindahl mechanisms," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 16(1), pages 15-40, March.
    11. Jacek B. Krawczyk & Mabel Tidball, 2016. "Economic Problems with Constraints: How Efficiency Relates to Equilibrium," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 18(04), pages 1-19, December.
    12. Reischmann, Andreas & Oechssler, Joerg, 2018. "The Binary Conditional Contribution Mechanism for public good provision in dynamic settings — Theory and experimental evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 159(C), pages 104-115.

  5. Mathevet, Laurent A., 2010. "Supermodular mechanism design," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 5(3), September.

    Cited by:

    1. Felix Bierbrauer & Nick Netzer, 2012. "Mechanism design and intentions," ECON - Working Papers 066, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Apr 2014.
    2. Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Beliefs and rationalizability in games with complementarities," MPRA Paper 36032, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Olga Gorelkina, 2015. "The Expected Externality Mechanism in a Level-k Environment," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2015_03, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    4. Mathevet, Laurent & Taneva, Ina, 2013. "Finite supermodular design with interdependent valuations," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 327-349.
    5. Korpela Ville, 2016. "Procedurally Fair Implementation: The Cost of Insisting on Symmetry," Discussion Papers 108, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    6. Anne-Christine Barthel & Tarun Sabarwal, 2016. "Directional Monotone Comparative Statics," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 201601, University of Kansas, Department of Economics.
    7. Rivas, Javier, 2015. "Mechanism design and bounded rationality: The case of type misreporting," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 6-13.
    8. Olga Gorelkina, 2018. "The expected externality mechanism in a level-k environment," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 47(1), pages 103-131, March.
    9. Healy, Paul J. & Mathevet, Laurent, 2012. "Designing stable mechanisms for economic environments," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(3), September.

  6. Laurent Mathevet, 2010. "A contraction principle for finite global games," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 42(3), pages 539-563, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Jackson, Matthew O. & Mathevet, Laurent & Mattes, Kyle, 2007. "Nomination Processes and Policy Outcomes," Quarterly Journal of Political Science, now publishers, vol. 2(1), pages 67-92, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (4) 2005-12-14 2012-02-01 2012-05-15 2012-10-13
  2. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (3) 2012-02-01 2012-05-15 2012-10-13
  3. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2006-08-19 2007-03-10
  4. NEP-CTA: Contract Theory & Applications (1) 2012-02-01
  5. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2006-08-19

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