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Jason J. Delaney

Personal Details

First Name:Jason
Middle Name:J.
Last Name:Delaney
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pde935
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Terminal Degree: Department of Economics; Andrew Young School of Policy Studies; Georgia State University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

School of Business
Georgia Gwinnett College

Lawrenceville, Georgia (United States)
http://www.ggc.edu/academics/schools/school-of-business/

: 6784075000

1000 University Center Lane, Lawrenceville, GA 30043
RePEc:edi:sbggcus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jason Delaney & Sarah Jacobson & Thorsten Moenig, 2017. "Preference Discovery," Department of Economics Working Papers 2017-02, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Dec 2018.
  2. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney & Thorsten Moenig, 2014. "Discovered Preferences for Risky and Non-Risky Goods," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  3. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2013. "Those Outsiders: How Downstream Externalities Affect Public Good Provision," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  4. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2013. "Payments or persuasion: common pool resource management with price and non-price measures," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-02, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.
  5. Delaney, Jason J. & Winters, John V., 2013. "Sinners or Saints? Preachers' Kids and Risky Health Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 7434, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  6. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocity in the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  7. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocal Acts and the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jun 2015.
  8. Jason Delaney, 2009. "An Experimental Test of the Pigovian Hypothesis," Experimental Economics Center Working Paper Series 2010-02, Experimental Economics Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

Articles

  1. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2015. "The good of the few: Reciprocal acts and the provision of a public bad," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 46-55.
  2. Jason Delaney & John Winters, 2014. "Sinners or Saints? Preachers’ Kids and Risky Health Behaviors," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(4), pages 464-476, December.
  3. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2014. "Those outsiders: How downstream externalities affect public good provision," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 340-352.
  4. Delaney, Jason J., 2011. "Jeffrey T. Young, ed., Elgar Companion to Adam Smith (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2009), pp. xxv, 374, $215. ISBN 978-1-84542-019-2," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(03), pages 403-405, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney & Thorsten Moenig, 2014. "Discovered Preferences for Risky and Non-Risky Goods," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Somerville, Jason & McGowan, Féidhlim, 2016. "Can chocolate cure blindness? Investigating the effect of preference strength and incentives on the incidence of Choice Blindness," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-11.

  2. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2013. "Those Outsiders: How Downstream Externalities Affect Public Good Provision," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Sherstyuk, Katerina & Tarui, Nori & Wengrin, Melinda Podor & Viloria, Jay & Saijo, Tatsuyoshi, 2014. "Other-regarding behavior under collective action," CEI Working Paper Series 2014-2, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocity in the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    3. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocal Acts and the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jun 2015.
    4. Dekel, Sagi & Fischer, Sven & Zultan, Ro’i, 2017. "Potential Pareto Public Goods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 87-96.
    5. Blanco, Esther & Haller, Tobias & Walker, James M., 2018. "Provision of environmental public goods: Unconditional and conditional donations from outsiders," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 815-831.
    6. Esther Blanco & Tobias Haller & James M. Walker, 2016. "Provision of public goods: Unconditional and conditional donations from outsiders," Working Papers 2016-16, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck, revised Nov 2016.

  3. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2013. "Payments or persuasion: common pool resource management with price and non-price measures," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-02, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Mar 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Ashish R. Hota & Shreyas Sundaram, 2018. "Controlling Human Utilization of Failure-Prone Systems via Taxes," Papers 1802.09490, arXiv.org.
    2. Kene Boun My & Benjamin Ouvrard, 2017. "Nudge and Tax in an Environmental Public Goods Experiment: Does Environmental Sensitivity Matter?," Working Papers of BETA 2017-06, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. Matthew Gibson & Jamie T. Mullins & Alison Hill, 2019. "Climate Risk and Beliefs: Evidence from New York Floodplains," Department of Economics Working Papers 2019-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    4. Gee, Laura Katherine & Lyu, Xinxin & Urry, Heather, 2017. "Anger Management: Aggression and Punishment in the Provision of Public Goods," IZA Discussion Papers 10499, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Leah H. Palm-Forster & Paul J. Ferraro & Nicholas Janusch & Christian A. Vossler & Kent D. Messer, 2019. "Behavioral and Experimental Agri-Environmental Research: Methodological Challenges, Literature Gaps, and Recommendations," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 73(3), pages 719-742, July.
    6. Benjamin Ouvrard & Anne Stenger, 2017. "Nudging with heterogeneity in terms of environmental sensitivity : a public goods experiment in networks," Working Papers of BETA 2017-36, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    7. Oniki, S. & Berhe, M. & Negash, T., 2018. "Roles of the social norms on participation in the communal land distribution program in Ethiopia," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277070, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

  4. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocity in the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2013. "Those Outsiders: How Downstream Externalities Affect Public Good Provision," Department of Economics Working Papers 2013-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    2. Nicholas Wilson, 2012. "Shock to the System: Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Child Mortality," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jul 2013.
    3. Werner Güth & Anastasios Koukoumelis & M. Vittoria Levati & Matteo Ploner, 2013. "Providing negative cost public projects under a fair mechanism: An experimental analysis," Jena Economic Research Papers 2013-021, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Güth, Werner & Koukoumelis, Anastasios & Levati, M. Vittoria & Ploner, Matteo, 2014. "Providing revenue-generating projects under a fair mechanism: An experimental analysis," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 410-419.

  5. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocal Acts and the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers 2014-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jun 2015.

    Cited by:

    1. Dekel, Sagi & Fischer, Sven & Zultan, Ro’i, 2017. "Potential Pareto Public Goods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 87-96.

Articles

  1. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2015. "The good of the few: Reciprocal acts and the provision of a public bad," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 46-55.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Delaney, Jason & Jacobson, Sarah, 2014. "Those outsiders: How downstream externalities affect public good provision," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 340-352.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (4) 2010-04-04 2012-01-25 2013-09-24 2013-10-02
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (3) 2013-09-24 2013-10-02 2014-03-15
  3. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (3) 2012-01-25 2014-03-15 2017-03-26
  4. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (2) 2014-03-15 2017-03-26
  5. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (1) 2013-10-02
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-06-24
  7. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2013-09-24
  8. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2012-01-25
  9. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2013-06-24
  10. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2013-10-02
  11. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2017-03-26
  12. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2010-04-04
  13. NEP-PPM: Project, Program & Portfolio Management (1) 2013-10-02
  14. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (1) 2012-01-25
  15. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2012-01-25

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