IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pba728.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Tavis Barr

Personal Details

First Name:Tavis
Middle Name:
Last Name:Barr
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba728
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.tavisbarr.com

Affiliation

School of Economics and Resource Management
Beijing Normal University

Beijing, China
http://serm.bnu.edu.cn/
RePEc:edi:sebnucn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Barr, Tavis & Lin, Carl, 2013. "A Detailed Decomposition of Synthetic Cohort Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7743, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Tavis Barr & Raicho Bojilov & Lalith Munasinghe, 2019. "Referrals and Search Efficiency: Who Learns What and When?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(4), pages 1267-1300.
  2. Barr, Tavis & Lin, Carl, 2015. "A detailed decomposition of synthetic cohort analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 76-80.
  3. Tavis Barr, 2009. "With Friends Like These: Endogenous Labor Market Segregation with Homogeneous, Nonprejudiced Agents," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 703-746, July.
  4. Barr, Tavis & Roy, Udayan, 2008. "The effect of labor market monopsony on economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1446-1467, December.
  5. Tavis Barr, 1997. "An ado-file implementation of a simplex-based maximization algorithm," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(32).

Chapters

  1. Tavis Barr, 2009. "The Roster-in-a-Box Course Management System," EHUCHAPS, in: Ignacio Díaz-Emparanza & Petr Mariel & María Victoria Esteban (ed.), Econometrics with gretl. Proceedings of the gretl Conference 2009, edition 1, chapter 13, pages 203-215, Universidad del País Vasco - Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Barr, Tavis & Lin, Carl, 2013. "A Detailed Decomposition of Synthetic Cohort Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 7743, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Okumura, Tsunao & Usui, Emiko, 2016. "Intergenerational Transmission of Skills and Differences in Labor Market Outcomes for Blacks and Whites," IZA Discussion Papers 9662, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Serge Atherwood & Corey S Sparks, 2019. "Early-career trajectories of young workers in the U.S. in the context of the 2008–09 recession: The effect of labor market entry timing," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(3), pages 1-30, March.
    3. Dong Zhou, 2016. "The Long-term Impacts of the Cultural Revolution: A Micro-Analysis," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 30(3), pages 285-317, September.

Articles

  1. Tavis Barr & Raicho Bojilov & Lalith Munasinghe, 2019. "Referrals and Search Efficiency: Who Learns What and When?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(4), pages 1267-1300.

    Cited by:

    1. Emre Ekinci, 2022. "Monetary rewards in employee referral programs," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 90(1), pages 35-58, January.
    2. Dariel, Aurelie & Riedl, Arno & Siegenthaler, Simon, 2021. "Referral hiring and wage formation in a market with adverse selection," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 109-130.
    3. María Paz Espinosa & Jaromír Kovárík & Sofía Ruíz-Palazuelos, 2021. "Are close-knit networks good for employment?," Working Papers 21.06, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.

  2. Barr, Tavis & Lin, Carl, 2015. "A detailed decomposition of synthetic cohort analysis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 76-80.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Tavis Barr, 2009. "With Friends Like These: Endogenous Labor Market Segregation with Homogeneous, Nonprejudiced Agents," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 703-746, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Dieter Bögenhold, 2013. "Social Network Analysis and the Sociology of Economics: Filling a Blind Spot with the Idea of Social Embeddedness," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(2), pages 293-318, April.
    2. Brian Rubineau & Roberto M. Fernandez, 2015. "Tipping Points: The Gender Segregating and Desegregating Effects of Network Recruitment," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 26(6), pages 1646-1664, December.
    3. Dieter Bögenhold, 2010. "From Heterodoxy to Orthodoxy and Vice Versa: Economics and Social Sciences in the Division of Academic Work," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(5), pages 1566-1590, November.

  4. Barr, Tavis & Roy, Udayan, 2008. "The effect of labor market monopsony on economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1446-1467, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Werner & Friedrich L. Sell, 2015. "Price Effects of the Minimum Wage: A Survey Data Analysis for the German Construction Sector," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(3), pages 310-326, September.
    2. Franziska Prockl & Bernd Frick, 2018. "Wage Determination In A Regulated Labor Market: Empirical Evidence From Major League Soccer," Working Papers Dissertations 39, Paderborn University, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics.
    3. Sell, Friedrich L. & Ruf, Ernst K., 2014. "Anmerkungen zum Monopson am Arbeitsmarkt II," Working Papers in Economics 2014,1, Bundeswehr University Munich, Economic Research Group.
    4. Friedrich L. Sell & Ernst K. Ruf, 2016. "Monopsony in the Labor Market, Minimum Wages and the Time Horizon: Some Unresolved Issues," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 44(1), pages 75-90, March.
    5. Hojun Sung & Brian M. Mills & Younghoon Lee, 2022. "Moments of Competitive Balance in Major League Soccer," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 23(3), pages 329-354, April.
    6. Werner, Thomas & Sell, Friedrich L. & Reinisch, David C., 2013. "Price effects of minimum wages: Evidence from the construction sector in East and West Germany," Working Papers in Economics 2013,4, Bundeswehr University Munich, Economic Research Group.
    7. Arsenault Morin, Alex & Geloso, Vincent & Kufenko, Vadim, 2016. "Monopsony and industrial development in nineteenth century Quebec: The impact of seigneurial tenure," Violette Reihe: Schriftenreihe des Promotionsschwerpunkts "Globalisierung und Beschäftigung" 51/2016, University of Hohenheim, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Evangelisches Studienwerk.
    8. John Twomey & James Monks, 2011. "Monopsony and Salary Suppression: The Case of Major League Soccer in the United States," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 56(1), pages 20-28, May.

  5. Tavis Barr, 1997. "An ado-file implementation of a simplex-based maximization algorithm," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(32).

    Cited by:

    1. Jolliffe, Dean, 2004. "The impact of education in rural Ghana: examining household labor allocation and returns on and off the farm," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 287-314, February.

Chapters

    Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2013-11-29

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Tavis Barr should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.