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Markus Baltzer

Personal Details

First Name:Markus
Middle Name:
Last Name:Baltzer
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1117
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.bundesbank.de/Navigation/EN/Bundesbank/Research_centre/People/People.html
Terminal Degree:2005 Wirtschaftswissenschaftlichen Fakultät; Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Deutsche Bundesbank

Frankfurt, Germany
http://www.bundesbank.de/

: 0 69 / 95 66 - 0
0 69 / 95 66 30 77
Postfach 10 06 02, 60006 Frankfurt
RePEc:edi:dbbgvde (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2013. "Is local bias a cross-border phenomenon? Evidence from individual investors' international asset allocation," Discussion Papers 18/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  2. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2011. "Home-field advantage or a matter of ambiguity aversion? Local bias among German individual investors," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,23, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  3. Markus Baltzer, 2006. "European Financial Market Integration in the Gründerboom and Gründerkrach: Evidence from European Cross-Listings," Working Papers 111, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).

Articles

  1. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2013. "Is local bias a cross-border phenomenon? Evidence from individual investors’ international asset allocation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2823-2835.
  2. Jacek Wallusch & Markus Baltzer, 2009. "Inflation, Interest Rate and Innovations in Pre-WWI Germany (1878-1913)," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 52(3/4), pages 275-288.
  3. Baltzer, Markus & Baten, Jörg, 2008. "Height, trade, and inequality in the Latin American periphery, 1950-2000," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 191-203, July.
  4. Markus Baltzer, 2008. "Finance Capitalism and Germany's Rise to Industrial Power. By CAROLINE FOHLIN," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 801-802, November.
  5. Markus Baltzer & Gerhard Kling, 2007. "Predictability of future economic growth and the credibility of monetary regimes in Germany, 1870-2003," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 401-404.
  6. Baltzer, Markus, 2006. "Cross-listed stocks as an information vehicle of speculation: Evidence from European cross-listings in the early 1870s," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(03), pages 301-327, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2013. "Is local bias a cross-border phenomenon? Evidence from individual investors' international asset allocation," Discussion Papers 18/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Curran & Adnan Velic, 2016. "Real Exchange Rate Persistence and Country Characteristics," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 31, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    2. Martijn Boermans & Robert Vermeulen, 2016. "International investment positions revisited: Investor heterogeneity and individual security characteristics," DNB Working Papers 531, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    3. Vahagn Galstyan & Adnan Velic, 2017. "International Investment Patterns: The Case of German Sectors," Trinity Economics Papers tep0217, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2018.

  2. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2011. "Home-field advantage or a matter of ambiguity aversion? Local bias among German individual investors," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,23, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    Cited by:

    1. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2013. "Is local bias a cross-border phenomenon? Evidence from individual investors' international asset allocation," Discussion Papers 18/2013, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    2. Schoors, Koen & Semenova, Maria & Zubanov, Andrey, 2017. "Depositor discipline in Russian regions: Flight to familiarity or trust in local authorities?," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    3. Lars Hornuf & Matthias Neuenkirch, 2017. "Pricing shares in equity crowdfunding," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 795-811, April.
    4. Dehua Shen & Xiao Li & Andrea Teglio & Wei Zhang, 2016. "The impact of information-based familiarity on the stock market," Working Papers 2016/08, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).

  3. Markus Baltzer, 2006. "European Financial Market Integration in the Gründerboom and Gründerkrach: Evidence from European Cross-Listings," Working Papers 111, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).

    Cited by:

    1. Athanasios Koulakiotis & Katerina Lyroudi & Nikos Thomaidis & Nicholas Papasyriopoulos, 2010. "The impact of cross-listings on the UK and the German stock markets," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 27(1), pages 4-18, March.

Articles

  1. Baltzer, Markus & Stolper, Oscar & Walter, Andreas, 2013. "Is local bias a cross-border phenomenon? Evidence from individual investors’ international asset allocation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2823-2835.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Baltzer, Markus & Baten, Jörg, 2008. "Height, trade, and inequality in the Latin American periphery, 1950-2000," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 191-203, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Challú, Amílcar E. & Silva-Castañeda, Sergio, 2016. "Towards an anthropometric history of latin America in the second half of the twentieth century," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 226-234.
    2. Dobado-González, Rafael & Garcia-Hiernaux, Alfredo, 2017. "Two worlds apart: Determinants of height in late 18th century central Mexico," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 153-163.
    3. Blum, Matthias, 2014. "Estimating male and female height inequality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 103-108.

  3. Markus Baltzer & Gerhard Kling, 2007. "Predictability of future economic growth and the credibility of monetary regimes in Germany, 1870-2003," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 401-404.

    Cited by:

    1. Leo Krippner & Leif Anders Thorsrud, 2009. "Forecasting New Zealand's economic growth using yield curve information," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2009/18, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

  4. Baltzer, Markus, 2006. "Cross-listed stocks as an information vehicle of speculation: Evidence from European cross-listings in the early 1870s," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(03), pages 301-327, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Carsten Burhop, 2011. "The Underpricing of Initial Public Offerings at the Berlin Stock Exchange, 1870–96," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 12(1), pages 11-32, February.
    2. Dorsman, André & Gounopoulos, Dimitrios, 2013. "European Sovereign Debt Crisis and the performance of Dutch IPOs," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 308-319.
    3. Opitz, Alexander, 2015. "Democratic prospects in Imperial Russia: The revolution of 1905 and the political stock market," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 15-2015, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    4. Sebastian A.J. Keibek, 2016. "Using probate data to determine historical male occupational structures," Working Papers 26, Department of Economic and Social History at the University of Cambridge, revised 21 Mar 2017.
    5. Gelman, Sergey & Burhop, Carsten, 2008. "Taxation, regulation and the information efficiency of the Berlin stock exchange, 1892–1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(01), pages 39-66, April.
    6. Thorsten Lübbers, 2009. "Is Cartelisation Profitable? A Case Study of the Rhenish Westphalian Coal Syndicate, 1893-1913," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_09, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2006-02-12
  2. NEP-FMK: Financial Markets (1) 2006-02-12
  3. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2011-12-13
  4. NEP-IFN: International Finance (1) 2013-05-22
  5. NEP-UPT: Utility Models & Prospect Theory (1) 2011-12-13

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