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Joao Paulo Cabral Pereira

Personal Details

First Name:Joao
Middle Name:Paulo Cabral
Last Name:Pereira
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppe179

Affiliation

Unidade de Estudos sobre Complexidade e Economia (UECE)
Research in Economics and Mathematics (REM)
Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestão (ISEG)
Universidade de Lisboa

Lisboa, Portugal
https://uece.rc.iseg.ulisboa.pt/

: +351-213 925 912
+351-213 971 196
Rua Miguel Lupi 20, 1249-078 Lisboa
RePEc:edi:ueutlpt (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Manuel Guerra & João Pereira & Miguel St. Aubyn, 2018. "Life cycles with Endogenous Time Allocation and Age-Dependent Mortality," Working Papers REM 2018/56, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
  2. Miguel St. Aubyn & João Pereira, 2004. "What Level of Education Matters Most for Growth? Evidence from Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2004/13, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.

Articles

  1. Pereira, João & St. Aubyn, Miguel, 2009. "What level of education matters most for growth?: Evidence from Portugal," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 67-73, February.
  2. João Paulo Pereira, 2005. "Measuring Human Capital in Portugal," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 21, pages 16-34, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Miguel St. Aubyn & João Pereira, 2004. "What Level of Education Matters Most for Growth? Evidence from Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2004/13, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Ştefan Armeanu & Georgeta Vintilă & Ştefan Cristian Gherghina, 2017. "Empirical Study towards the Drivers of Sustainable Economic Growth in EU-28 Countries," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-22, December.
    2. Marta Simões & Adelaide Duarte, 2007. "Education and growth: an industry-level analysis of the Portuguese manufacturing," GEMF Working Papers 2007-03, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    3. Raul Ramos & Manuel Artís & Jordi Suriñach, 2009. "Human Capital Spillovers Productivity and Regional Convergence in Spain," IREA Working Papers 200925, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Nov 2009.
    4. Panagiotis Pegkas & Constantinos Tsamadias, 2017. "Are There Separate Effects of Male and Female Higher Education on Economic Growth? Evidence from Greece," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(1), pages 279-293, March.
    5. Panagiotis Pegkas & Constantinos Tsamadias, 2014. "Does Higher Education Affect Economic Growth? The Case of Greece," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(3), pages 425-444, September.
    6. Gazi Mainul Hassan & Arusha Cooray, 2013. "Effects of Male and Female Education on Economic Growth: Some Evidence from Asia Using the Extreme Bounds Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 13/10, University of Waikato.
    7. Panagiotis PEGKAS & Constantinos TSAMADIAS, 2015. "Does Formal Education At All Levels Cause Economic Growth? Evidence From Greece," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 15, pages 9-32, June.
    8. Mariya Neycheva, 2010. "Does public expenditure on education matter for growth in Europe? A comparison between old EU member states and post-communist economies," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 141-164.
    9. Miettinen Marika Rosanna & Littunen Hannu, 2013. "Factors Contributing to the Success of Start-Up Firms Using Two-Point or Multiple-Point Scale Models," Entrepreneurship Research Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 3(4), pages 449-481, June.
    10. Johan Lundberg, 2017. "Does academic research affect local growth? Empirical evidence based on Swedish data," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(4), pages 586-601, April.
    11. Marta C. N. Simões, 2011. "Education Composition and Growth: A Pooled Mean Group Analysis of OECD Countries," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 58(4), pages 455-471, December.
    12. Catarina Cardoso & Eric J. Pentecost, 2011. "Regional Growth and Convergence: The Role of Human Capital in the Portuguese Regions," Discussion Paper Series 2011_03, Department of Economics, Loughborough University, revised Sep 2011.
    13. Mariya Neycheva, 2016. "Secondary versus higher education for growth: the case of three countries with different human capital’s structure and quality," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2367-2393, November.
    14. Herbst, Mikolaj & Wójcik, Piotr, 2011. "Growth and divergence of the polish subregions over 1995–2006: a search for determinants and spatial patterns," MPRA Paper 34731, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Hassan, Gazi & Cooray, Arusha, 2015. "Effects of male and female education on economic growth: Some evidence from Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 97-109.
    16. Agasisti, Tommaso & Gralka, Sabine, 2017. "The transient and persistent efficiency of Italian and German universities: A stochastic frontier analysis," CEPIE Working Papers 14/17, Technische Universität Dresden, Center of Public and International Economics (CEPIE).
    17. Teixeira, Aurora A.C. & Fortuna, Natércia, 2010. "Human capital, R&D, trade, and long-run productivity. Testing the technological absorption hypothesis for the Portuguese economy, 1960-2001," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 335-350, April.
    18. Benos, Nikos & Karagiannis, Stelios, 2016. "Do education quality and spillovers matter? Evidence on human capital and productivity in Greece," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 563-573.
    19. Sara Corujo & Marta Simões, 2012. "Democracy and Growth: Evidence for Portugal (1960–2001)," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(3), pages 512-528, March.
    20. Shujin Zhu & Renyu Li, 2017. "Economic complexity, human capital and economic growth: empirical research based on cross-country panel data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(38), pages 3815-3828, August.
    21. Zhang, Chuanguo & Zhuang, Lihuan, 2011. "The composition of human capital and economic growth: Evidence from China using dynamic panel data analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 165-171, March.
    22. Karatheodoros Anastasios & Tsamadias Constantinos & Pegkas Panagiotis, 2019. "The effects of formal educations’ levels on regional economic growth in Greece over the period 1995–2012," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 39(1), pages 91-111, February.
    23. Benos, Nikos & Karagiannis, Stelios, 2013. "Do Cross-Section Dependence and Parameter Heterogeneity Matter? Evidence on Human Capital and Productivity in Greece," MPRA Paper 53326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    24. Mariya Neycheva, 2013. "Does higher level of education of the labor force cause growth? Evidence from Bulgaria," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 321-339, August.
    25. Bahar Bayraktar-Sağlam, 2016. "The Stages of Human Capital and Economic Growth: Does the Direction of Causality Matter for the Rich and the Poor?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(1), pages 243-302, May.
    26. João Sousa Andrade & Adelaide Duarte & Marta Simões, 2011. "Inequality and Growth in Portugal: a time series analysis," GEMF Working Papers 2011-11, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    27. Lodhi, Abdul Salam & Tsegai, Daniel W. & Gerber, Nicolas, 2011. "Determinants of participation in child’s education and alternative activities in Pakistan," Discussion Papers 119110, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

Articles

  1. Pereira, João & St. Aubyn, Miguel, 2009. "What level of education matters most for growth?: Evidence from Portugal," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 67-73, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. João Paulo Pereira, 2005. "Measuring Human Capital in Portugal," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 21, pages 16-34, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Miguel St. Aubyn & João Pereira, 2004. "What Level of Education Matters Most for Growth? Evidence from Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2004/13, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    2. Sara Corujo & Marta Simões, 2012. "Democracy and Growth: Evidence for Portugal (1960–2001)," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(3), pages 512-528, March.
    3. Aurora A.C. Teixeira & Natércia Fortuna, 2006. "Human capital, trade and long-run productivity. Testing the technological absorption hypothesis for the Portuguese economy, 1960-2001," FEP Working Papers 226, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations or Wikipedia entries:
  1. Portuguese Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2018-11-19
  2. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (1) 2018-11-19
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2018-11-19
  4. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2018-11-19
  5. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2005-05-07
  6. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2018-11-19
  7. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2018-11-19

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