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Rainer Eising

Personal Details

First Name:Rainer
Middle Name:
Last Name:Eising
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pei20
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.sowi.rub.de/pw2/team/eising.html.de

Affiliation

Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Ruhr-University Bochum)

http://www.ruhr-uni-bochum.de/Index.html
Bochum

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Rainer Eising, 2005. "The access of business interests to European Union institutions: notes towards a theory," ARENA Working Papers 29, ARENA.
  2. Rainer Eising, 2000. "Bounded Rationality and Policy Learning in EU Negotiations: the Liberalization of the Electricity Supply Industry," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 26, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).

Articles

  1. Eising, Rainer, 2002. "Policy Learning in Embedded Negotiations: Explaining EU Electricity Liberalization," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(01), pages 85-120, December.
  2. Eising, Rainer, . "Interest groups in EU policy-making," Living Reviews in European Governance (LREG), Institute for European integration research (EIF).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Rainer Eising, 2005. "The access of business interests to European Union institutions: notes towards a theory," ARENA Working Papers 29, ARENA.

    Cited by:

    1. Anne Gullberg, 2008. "Rational lobbying and EU climate policy," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 161-178, June.

  2. Rainer Eising, 2000. "Bounded Rationality and Policy Learning in EU Negotiations: the Liberalization of the Electricity Supply Industry," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 26, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).

    Cited by:

    1. Rowlands, Ian H., 2005. "The European directive on renewable electricity: conflicts and compromises," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 965-974, May.

Articles

  1. Eising, Rainer, 2002. "Policy Learning in Embedded Negotiations: Explaining EU Electricity Liberalization," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(01), pages 85-120, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Böhling, Kathrin, 2002. "Learning from environmental actors about environmental developments: the case of international organizations," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Organisation and Technology FS II 02-110, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Cornelia Woll, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade. Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," Sciences Po publications 05/01, Sciences Po.
    3. Bertrand Quélin & Jean-Philippe Bonardi & Santiago Urbiztondo, 2009. "The political economy of international regulatory convergence in public utilities," Post-Print hal-00491668, HAL.
    4. Vassilis Monastiriotis, 2008. "Quo Vadis Southeast Europe? EU Accession, Regional Cooperation and the need for a Balkan Development Strategy," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 10, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.
    5. Tosun, Jale & Solorio, Israel, 2011. "Exploring the Energy-Environment Relationship in the EU: Perspectives and Challenges for Theorizing and Empirical Analysis," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 15, November.
    6. Clifton, Judith & Díaz-Fuentes, Daniel & Revuelta, Julio, 2009. "Explaining Telecoms and Electricity Internationalization in the European Union: A Political Economy Perspective," MPRA Paper 33037, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Eva Niesten & Albert Jolink, 2014. "Absence of a market in the Dutch balancing mechanism: European rules versus specific investments," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 71-90, August.
    8. Höpner, Martin & Schäfer, Armin, 2010. "Polanyi in Brussels? Embeddedness and the three dimensions of European economic integration," MPIfG Discussion Paper 10/8, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    9. Gerda Falkner, 2011. "Interlinking neofunctionalism and intergovernmentalism: Sidelining governments and manipulating policy preferences as "passerelles"," Working Papers of the Vienna Institute for European integration research (EIF) 3, Institute for European integration research (EIF).
    10. Christina J. Schneider & Johannes Urpelainen, 2014. "Partisan Heterogeneity and International Cooperation," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 58(1), pages 120-142, February.
    11. Woll, Cornelia, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade: Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," MPIfG Discussion Paper 05/1, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    12. Witold J. Henisz & Bennet A. Zelner & Mauro F. Guillen, 2004. "International Coercion, Emulation and Policy Diffusion: Market-Oriented Infrastructure Reforms, 1977-1999," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-713, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    13. Dederke, Julian, 2014. "Bahnliberalisierung in der Europäischen Union: Die Rolle des EuGH als politischer und politisch restringierter Akteur bei der Transformation staatsnaher Sektoren," PIPE - Papers on International Political Economy 20/2014, Free University Berlin, Center for International Political Economy.
    14. Cornelia Woll, 2005. "Learning to Act on World Trade. Preference Formation of Large Firms in the United States and the European Union," Working Papers hal-01065571, HAL.

  2. Eising, Rainer, . "Interest groups in EU policy-making," Living Reviews in European Governance (LREG), Institute for European integration research (EIF).

    Cited by:

    1. Anna Zabkowicz, 2015. "Institutional inertia in crisis management and interest representation: the case of the European Union," Ekonomia i Prawo, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 14(3), pages 351-368, September.
    2. Glatz, Annika, 2013. "Interest Groups in International Intellectual Property Negotiations," Papers 928, World Trade Institute.
    3. Scharpf, Fritz W., 2016. "De-constitutionalization and majority rule: A democratic vision for Europe," MPIfG Discussion Paper 16/14, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
    4. Åse Gornitzka & Ulf Sverdrup, 2015. "Societal Inclusion in Expert Venues: Participation of Interest Groups and Business in the European Commission Expert Groups," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 3(1), pages 151-165.
    5. Anna Zabkowicz, 2014. "Organized Economic Interests And European Integration: The Question Of (Neo)Corporatism," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 9(1), pages 7-20, March.
    6. Anna Zabkowicz, 2015. "Governing economic interests by the European Commission," Ekonomia i Prawo, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 14(1), pages 95-111, March.

More information

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Statistics

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NEP Fields

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  1. No paper was announced in a field specific NEP report

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