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Conditionality Revisited : Concepts, Experiences, and Lessons

Author

Listed:
  • Stefan Koeberle
  • Harold Bedoya
  • Peter Silarszky
  • Gero Verheyen

Abstract

This volume illustrates many questions around the different donor approaches to conditionality remain controversial. How relevant is the number of conditions? Is ex ante or ex post conditionality more conducive as a mutual commitment device? How can budget support be more predictable-by focusing conditions on specific policy actions or on outcomes? How can risks be managed, and what is the optimal risk and failure rate of conditions and programs? Ex post conditionality based on completed actions provides an alternative to traditional ex ante conditionality that promises to be more flexible and more supportive of government ownership. It is at the core of the programmatic approach to policy-based lending that has increasingly become the World Bank's choice to support medium-term reforms. Another possible design option involves

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Koeberle & Harold Bedoya & Peter Silarszky & Gero Verheyen, 2005. "Conditionality Revisited : Concepts, Experiences, and Lessons," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7346.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:7346
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/7346/32524a.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Stefan G. Koeberle, 2003. "Should Policy-Based Lending Still Involve Conditionality?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 249-273.
    2. Kanbur, Ravi & Sandler, Todd & Morrison, Kevin, 1999. "The Future of Development Assistance: Common Pools and International Public Goods," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1629, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Howard White & Oliver Morrissey, 1997. "Conditionality When Donor And Recipient Preferences Vary," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 497-505.
    4. James M. Boughton, 2003. "Who's in Charge? Ownership and Conditionality in IMF-Supported Programs," IMF Working Papers 03/191, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Axel Dreher & Sarah Langlotz & Silvia Marchesi, 2017. "Information Transmission And Ownership Consolidation In Aid Programs," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(4), pages 1671-1688, October.
    2. Christopher Selvarajah, 2014. "Foreign aid imperatives in the Greater Mekong Subregion: case studies of Australian, Japanese and Thai Aid Coordination," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 21(1), pages 23-65, June.
    3. Contamin, Bernard & Milanesi, Julien & Montaud, Jean-Marc, 2008. "Les nouvelles logiques de l’aide publique au développement : entre rationalisation, pragmatisme et logiques institutionnelles," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 84(2), pages 155-178, juin.
    4. de Janvry, Alain & Dethier, Jean-Jacques, 2012. "The World Bank and governance : the Bank's efforts to help developing countries build state capacity," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6275, The World Bank.
    5. Joseph Forson, 2015. "Corruption, EU Aid Inflows and Economic Growth in Ghana: Cointegration and Causality Analysis," Managing Intellectual Capital and Innovation for Sustainable and Inclusive Society: Managing Intellectual Capital and Innovation; Proceedings of the MakeLearn and TIIM Joint International Conference 2, ToKnowPress.
    6. Yu-Fu Chen & Michael Funke & Aaron Mehrotra, 2017. "What Drives Urban Consumption in Mainland China? The Role of Property Price Dynamics," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, pages 383-409.

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