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India 2039: An Affluent Society in One Generation

Listed editor(s):
  • Harinder Kohli
    (Centennial Group International and the Emerging Markets Forum)

  • Anil Sood
    (Centennial Group International and the Emerging Markets Forum)

Registered editor(s):

This book provides a perspective on where India could be in the year 2039, if it maintains the economic growth rates it has experienced recently. In addition to emphasizing the virtuous cycle between growth and poverty reduction, the book outlines the salient challenges that India must overcome to achieve this end. These challenges include: Addressing structural inequalities that lie at the core of poverty and exclusion of the most vulnerable groups. The provision of education and health services, and infrastructure services to rural and urban populations. Ensuring an improved environment—clean air, clean water and sanitation etc. Launching an energy revolution, with a view to reducing the economy’s carbon intensity. Overcoming critical infrastructure bottlenecks. Improving the quality of education and access to secondary and tertiary education. Improving the business environment to foster entrepreneurship and innovation. Taking on the role of a responsible global citizen. The book proposes that India could be one of the top three global economic powers in 30 years. It presents a persuasive case that if India succeeds in sustaining its recent economic success over the longer term (as many East Asian economies have done in the past), India can realistically aspire to become an affluent society—with a GDP per capita of $22,000 (PPP terms and no poor people–within one generation. India 2039 assesses the many hurdles – political, social, policy and institutional – that India must overcome to realize its vision to become a modern, affluent, inclusive society and lift millions of Indians from relative poverty within 30 years. It provides an agenda of intergenerational issues that are central to India avoiding the middle income trap—where countries stagnate at middle income levels and are unable to achieve high income status– that so many other countries have fallen into. The recommendations emphasize a pro-active stance on the climate change agenda, because itis in India’s self-interest. In addition, the authors provide recommendations on the measures required to enhance India’s global competitiveness based on improving the business environment, strengthening innovation and entrepreneurship, and building the required physical, technological and information infrastructure. Importantly, the recommendations also covered cross-cutting issues such as: Improving governance at the national, state and municipal levels. Reform of the bureaucracy, civil service, and judiciary. Measures to address structural inequities, such as those based on ethnic and religious differences that affect the most vulnerable populations.

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This book is provided by Emerging Markets Forum in its series Books with number india2039 and published in 2010.
Edition: 1
Handle: RePEc:emf:booksf:india2039
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Emerging Markets Forum 2600 Virginia Ave, NW, Ste 201 Washington, DC 20037

Phone: 202-393-6663
Fax: 202-393-6556
Web page: http://www.emergingmarketsforum.org/

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  1. Rohini Pande, 2003. "Can Mandated Political Representation Increase Policy Influence for Disadvantaged Minorities? Theory and Evidence from India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1132-1151, September.
  2. Panagariya, Arvind, 2011. "India: The Emerging Giant," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199751563.
  3. Mark A. Dutz, 2007. "Unleashing India's Innovation : Toward Sustainable and Inclusive Growth," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6856.
  4. Indermit Gill & Homi Kharas, 2007. "An East Asian Renaissance : Ideas for Economic Growth," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6798.
  5. Nazmul Chaudhury & Jeffrey Hammer & Michael Kremer & Karthik Muralidharan & F. Halsey Rogers, 2006. "Missing in Action: Teacher and Health Worker Absence in Developing Countries," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 91-116, Winter.
  6. Santiago Levy & Michael Walton, 2009. "No Growth without Equity? Inequality, Interests, and Competition in Mexico," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13263.
  7. Marianne Bertrand & Paras Mehta & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2002. "Ferreting out Tunneling: An Application to Indian Business Groups," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 121-148.
  8. A.G. Kemp and A.S. Kasim, 2008. "A Least-Cost optimisation Model of Co2 Capture Applied to Major uK Power Plants Within The Eu-ETS Framework," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 99-134.
  9. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2004. "Can Labor Regulation Hinder Economic Performance? Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 91-134.
  10. Carl Dahlman & Anuja Utz, 2005. "India and the Knowledge Economy : Leveraging Strengths and Opportunities," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7356.
  11. M.A. Adelman and G.C. Watkins, 2008. "Reserve Prices and Mineral Resource Theory," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Special I), pages 1-16.
  12. Timothy Besley & Rohini Pande & Lupin Rahman & Vijayendra Rao, 2004. "The Politics of Public Good Provision: Evidence from Indian Local Governments," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 416-426, 04/05.
  13. Robert P. Taylor & Chandrasekar Govindarajalu & Jeremy Levin & Anke S. Meyer & William A. Ward, 2008. "Financing Energy Efficiency : Lessons from Brazil, China, India, and Beyond," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6349.
  14. Pawan Agarwal, 2006. "Higher Education in India: The Need for Change," Working Papers id:576, eSocialSciences.
  15. The World Bank,, 2005. "India: Re-Energizing the Agricultural Sector to Sustain Growth and Reduce Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195674323.
  16. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Duflo, Esther, 2003. "Inequality and Growth: What Can the Data Say?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 267-299, September.
  17. David De Ferranti & Guillermo E. Perry & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Michael Walton, 2004. "Inequality in Latin America : Breaking with History?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15009.
  18. Banerjee, Abhijit & Somanathan, Rohini, 2007. "The political economy of public goods: Some evidence from India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 287-314, March.
  19. Angus Deaton & Valerie Kozel, 2005. "Data and Dogma: The Great Indian Poverty Debate," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(2), pages 177-199.
  20. World Bank, 2004. "India - Urban Finance and Governance Review : Volume 2. Case Study Annexes," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14402, The World Bank.
  21. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1997. "Endogenous Growth Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262011662, December.
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