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Multi-Modal Competition and the Future of Mail

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Listed:
  • Michael A. Crew
  • Paul R. Kleindorfer

Abstract

This compilation of original papers selected from the 19th Conference on Postal and Delivery Economics and authored by an international cast of economists, lawyers, regulators and industry practitioners addresses perhaps the most significant problem that has ever faced the postal sector – electronic competition from information and communication technologies. This has increased significantly over the last few years with a consequent serious drop in mail volume.

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Suggested Citation

  • Michael A. Crew & Paul R. Kleindorfer (ed.), 2012. "Multi-Modal Competition and the Future of Mail," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14533.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:14533
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857935816.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mayhew, Glenn E & Winer, Russell S, 1992. "An Empirical Analysis of Internal and External Reference Prices Using Scanner Data," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 62-70, June.
    2. Briesch, Richard A, et al, 1997. "A Comparative Analysis of Reference Price Models," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 202-214, September.
    3. Levin, Irwin P & Gaeth, Gary J, 1988. "How Consumers Are Affected by the Framing of Attribute Information before and after Consuming the Product," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(3), pages 374-378, December.
    4. Alba, Joseph W, et al, 1999. "The Effect of Discount Frequency and Depth on Consumer Price Judgments," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 99-114, September.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan & Eldar Shafir, 2004. "A Behavioral-Economics View of Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 419-423, May.
    6. Daniel Kahneman & Jack L. Knetsch & Richard H. Thaler, 1991. "Anomalies: The Endowment Effect, Loss Aversion, and Status Quo Bias," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 193-206, Winter.
    7. George Loewenstein & Drazen Prelec, 1992. "Anomalies in Intertemporal Choice: Evidence and an Interpretation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 573-597.
    8. David R. Bell & James M. Lattin, 2000. "Looking for Loss Aversion in Scanner Panel Data: The Confounding Effect of Price Response Heterogeneity," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 19(2), pages 185-200, May.
    9. Winer, Russell S, 1986. "A Reference Price Model of Brand Choice for Frequently Purchased Products," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(2), pages 250-256, September.
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    Book Chapters

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    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • H0 - Public Economics - - General

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