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Real macroeconomic stability and the capital account in Chile and Colombia

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  • Ffrench-Davis, Ricardo
  • Villar Gómez, Leonardo

Abstract

In 1995, when contagion from the tequila crisis was spreading in latin America, both Chile and Colombia were exempt from contagion and presented high rates of economic growth. Several analysts attribute this positive performance to the fact that both had undertaken prudential measures to avoid excessive exposure to short term capital flows and pressures towards excessive real exchange rate appreciation: Both countries were using a reserve requirement on short term foreign indebtedness, crawling-bands, and other instruments for reducing domestic vulnerability to capital flows. The parallelism between Chile and Colombia continued after the Asian crisis. In this period, despite the fact that short-term liabilities represented only a small share of foreign debt in both countries, vulnerability to the international financial crisis was high. In both, real interest rates rose sharply in 1998 and GDP growth was negative in 1999. The similarities between Chile and Colombia, however, do not go much farther. During the 1990s, GDP growth rates were very high in Chile while in Colombia they were below historical standards. Chile had fiscal surpluses and high private savings, while in Colombia there was a rapidly increasing fiscal deficit and falling domestic savings. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the macroeconomic policies of Chile and Colombia during the 1990s, in particular the exchange rate regimes, the capital account regulations, and the gestation and management of financial crises.
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Suggested Citation

  • Ffrench-Davis, Ricardo & Villar Gómez, Leonardo, 2006. "Real macroeconomic stability and the capital account in Chile and Colombia," Copublicaciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1894.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecr:col014:1894
    Note: Includes bibliography
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. De Gregorio, Jose & Edwards, Sebastian & Valdes, Rodrigo O., 2000. "Controls on capital inflows: do they work?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 59-83, October.
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    3. Eliana Cardoso & Ilan Goldfajn, 1998. "Capital Flows to Brazil: The Endogeneity of Capital Controls," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(1), pages 161-202, March.
    4. Edwards, Sebastian, 2002. "The great exchange rate debate after Argentina," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 237-252, December.
    5. Ffrench-Davis, Ricardo & Larraín, Guillermo, 2003. "How optimal are the extremes?: Latin American exchange rate policies during the Asian crisis," Copublicaciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1797.
    6. Adolfo Barajas & Roberto Steiner, 2002. "Credit Stagnation in Latin America," IMF Working Papers 02/53, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Francisco Gallego & Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel, 1999. "Capital Controls in Chile: Effective? Efficient?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 59, Central Bank of Chile.
    8. Manuel Agosin & Ricardo French-Davis, 1997. "Managing capital inflows in Chile," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 24(2 Year 19), pages 297-326, December.
    9. Ffrench-Davis, Ricardo & Ocampo, José Antonio, 2001. "The globalization of financial volatility: challenges for emerging economies," Copublicaciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1700.
    10. S Berg, 2001. "Trends In Racial Fiscal Incidence In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 69(2), pages 243-268, June.
    11. Ocampo, José Antonio, 2006. "Overcoming Latin America's growth frustrations: the macro and mesoeconomic links," Copublicaciones, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), number 1891.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Rosa Evelia Sánchez, 2009. "Brief Review Of The Relationship Among Emigration, Poverty And Overseas Workers Remittances In Colombia," Revista de Economía y Administración, Universidad Autónoma de Occidente, December.
    2. Anoruo, Emmanuel & Ramchander, Sanjay & Thiewes, Harold, 2007. "Crisis, contagion and cross-border effects: Evidence from the Latin American closed-end fund market," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 403-418, March.
    3. César TAMAYO y Andrés VARGAS, 2007. "Revisando la evidencia sobre frenazos súbitos y crisis financieras," Archivos de Economía 003948, Departamento Nacional de Planeación.
    4. Rozenwurcel, Guillermo & Machinea, José Luis, 2005. "Macroeconomic coordination in Latin America: does it have a future?," Series Históricas 15, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    5. Titelman Kardonsky, Daniel & Vera, Cecilia, 2009. "A summary of the experiences of Chile and Colombia with unremunerated reserve requirements on capital flows during the 1990's," Financiamiento para el Desarrollo 221, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    6. Leonardo Villar & Pilar Esguerra, 2005. "Comercio Exterior Colombiano En El Siglo Xx," Borradores de Economia 358, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

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