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The role of random assignment in social policy research

Author

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  • Richard P. Nathan

    (Rockefeller Institute of Government)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Richard P. Nathan, 2008. "The role of random assignment in social policy research," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 401-415.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:27:y:2008:i:2:p:401-415
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.20330
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20330
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 69-85, Fall.
    2. Charles Michalopoulos & Howard S. Bloom & Carolyn J. Hill, 2004. "Can Propensity-Score Methods Match the Findings from a Random Assignment Evaluation of Mandatory Welfare-to-Work Programs?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 156-179, February.
    3. Heckman, J.J. & Hotz, V.J., 1988. "Choosing Among Alternative Nonexperimental Methods For Estimating The Impact Of Social Programs: The Case Of Manpower Training," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 88-12, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
    4. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    5. Elizabeth Ty Wilde & Robinson Hollister, 2007. "How close is close enough? Evaluating propensity score matching using data from a class size reduction experiment," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(3), pages 455-477.
    6. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    7. Roberto Agodini & Mark Dynarski, 2004. "Are Experiments the Only Option? A Look at Dropout Prevention Programs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 180-194, February.
    8. Friedlander, Daniel & Robins, Philip K, 1995. "Evaluating Program Evaluations: New Evidence on Commonly Used Nonexperimental Methods," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 923-937, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maureen A. Pirog & Anne L. Buffardi & Colleen K. Chrisinger & Pradeep Singh & John Briney, 2009. "Are the alternatives to randomized assignment nearly as good? Statistical corrections to nonrandomized evaluations," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 169-172.
    2. Wenhua Di & Jielai Ma & James C. Murdoch, 2010. "An analysis of the neighborhood impacts of a mortgage assistance program: A spatial hedonic model," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(4), pages 682-697.
    3. Eunsu Ju, 2009. "Is random assignment good enough?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 176-178.
    4. Laura Langbein, 2009. "Beyond random assignment for internal validity and beyond social research for random assignment," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 173-174.

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