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The impact of African growth and opportunity act (Agoa) on U.S. imports from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)


  • Bedassa Tadesse

    (Department of Economics, University of Minnesota-Duluth, Duluth, MN, USA)

  • Bichaka Fayissa

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN, USA)


We evaluate the impact of the unilateral trade policy concession known as African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) on U.S. imports from eligible Sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Using U.S.-SSA countries' trade data that span the years 1991-2006, we find that AGOA has contributed to the initiation of new and the intensification of existing U.S. imports in both manufactured and non-manufactured goods and several product categories. However, compared to its import initiation impact, the import intensification effect of the Act has been marginal. Our results have important policy implication for further intensification of African exports to the U.S. markets. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Bedassa Tadesse & Bichaka Fayissa, 2008. "The impact of African growth and opportunity act (Agoa) on U.S. imports from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 920-941.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:20:y:2008:i:7:p:920-941 DOI: 10.1002/jid.1446

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cooke, Edgar F A, 2011. "The impact of trade preferences on exports of developing countries: the case of the AGOA and CBI preferences of the USA," MPRA Paper 31439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cooke, Edgar F. A., 2011. "A matching approach to study the impact of agoa on Sub-Saharan African countries," MPRA Paper 34670, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:102:y:2018:i:c:p:243-261 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Cooke, Edgar F. A., 2012. "Is the impact of AGOA heterogeneous?," MPRA Paper 43277, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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