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Women migrant workers in the UK: social capital, well-being and integration

Author

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  • Marina Della Giusta

    (Centre for Institutional Performance, University of Reading, Reading, UK)

  • Uma Kambhampati

    (Centre for Institutional Performance, University of Reading, Reading, UK)

Abstract

This paper addresses the role of social connections in helping women migrants to settle in the UK. We focus on micro- and macro-social capital with the former including local social networks and organisation (comprising immediate family, other immigrants, neighbours, churches) and the latter including experience with local government supporting institutions. In this context, we present results from a pilot study based on data collected amongst women immigrant workers in the care sector in the UK. A majority of respondents in our sample come from Africa and Asia and 62 per cent arrived without family. Our results indicate that while education decreases the extent to which women in our sample feel settled, contact with the local community as well as living within an immigrant community helped the women to feel settled. Finally, their experience with services like housing and immigration proved very significant. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Della Giusta & Uma Kambhampati, 2006. "Women migrant workers in the UK: social capital, well-being and integration," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(6), pages 819-833.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:18:y:2006:i:6:p:819-833
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1316
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joel Sobel, 2002. "Can We Trust Social Capital?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 139-154, March.
    2. Charles F. Manski, 2000. "Economic Analysis of Social Interactions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 115-136, Summer.
    3. Marina Della Giusta, 2010. "Social Capital and Economic Development," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2010-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    4. Paul Mosley & Marina Della Giusta, 1999. "A model of social capital and access to productive resources," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 921-934.
    5. Galor, Oded & Stark, Oded, 1991. "The probability of return migration, migrants' work effort, and migrants' performance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 399-405, April.
    6. Maurice Schiff, 2004. "Labor Mobility, Trade, and Social Capital," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(4), pages 630-642, September.
    7. Borjas, George J & Bronars, Stephen G, 1991. "Immigration and the Family," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 123-148, April.
    8. Joni Hersch & Leslie S. Stratton, 2002. "Housework and Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 217-229.
    9. Lam, Wai Fung, 1996. "Institutional design of public agencies and coproduction: A study of irrigation associations in Taiwan," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(6), pages 1039-1054, June.
    10. Wade, Robert, 1985. "The market for public office: Why the Indian state is not better at development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 467-497, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marina Della Giusta & Uma Kambhampati, 2008. "His and Hers: Exploring Gender Puzzles and the Meaning of Life Satisfaction," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2008-65, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Calenda, Davide., 2014. "Investigating the working conditions of Filipino and Indian-born nurses in the UK," ILO Working Papers 994860913402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. repec:ilo:ilowps:486091 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Marina Della Giusta & Nigar Hashimzade, 2009. "Family Values and Educational Choice," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2009-01, Henley Business School, Reading University.

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