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The Polish Regional Labour Market Welfare Indicator and Its Links to Other Well-being Measures

Author

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  • Ręklewski Marek

    () (Ph.D., Statistical Office in Bydgoszcz, Labour Market Methodology Section, Poland)

  • Ryczkowski Maciej

    () (Ph.D., Statistical Office in Bydgoszcz, Labour Market Methodology Section, Poland, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Economic Sciences and Management, The Department of Economics, Toruń, Poland)

Abstract

We propose and construct an indicator of labour market well-being in Poland for the year 2013. The indicator is positively related to the degree of civilizational welfare, social welfare, material welfare and psychological well-being in Poland. We conclude that ameliorating the labour market situation improves the quality of the public’s life. The link between our labour market indicator and the total fertility rate turned out to be statistically insignificant.

Suggested Citation

  • Ręklewski Marek & Ryczkowski Maciej, 2016. "The Polish Regional Labour Market Welfare Indicator and Its Links to Other Well-being Measures," Comparative Economic Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 19(3), pages 113-132, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:vrs:coecre:v:19:y:2016:i:3:p:113-132:n:6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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