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The impact of a massive migration flow on the regional population structure: The case of Italy

  • Antonio Golini
  • Anna Di Bartolomeo
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    Low economic growth rates are a common problem in many developed countries in Europe. This paper aims to highlight the possible role of demographic factors. Problems of low growth may be exacerbated by an increase in dependency ratios. However, large-scale migrations have been shown to positively affect the age composition of a population. Focusing on Italy, we estimate the impact of migration on the working age population ratio, population size and gross domestic product. We also show that migration may affect the economic gap between the North and South, posing a new potential problem to policymakers.

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    File URL: http://epub.oeaw.ac.at/0xc1aa500d_0x0022ebe4
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    Article provided by Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna in its journal Vienna Yearbook of Population Research.

    Volume (Year): 7 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 149-165

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    Handle: RePEc:vid:yearbk:v:7:y:2009:i:1:p:149-165
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.oeaw.ac.at/vid/

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    1. David E. Bloom & David Canning & Pia N. Malaney, 1999. "Demographic Change and Economic Growth in Asia," CID Working Papers 15, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
    4. James Feyrer, 2007. "Demographics and Productivity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(1), pages 100-109, February.
    5. Matthew Higgins & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 1999. "Explaining Inequality the World Round: Cohort Size, Kuznets Curves, andOpenness," NBER Working Papers 7224, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Thomas Lindh & Bo Malmberg, 1999. "Age structure effects and growth in the OECD, 1950-1990," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 431-449.
    7. Allen Kelley & Robert Schmidt, 1995. "Aggregate population and economic growth correlations: The role of the components of demographic change," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(4), pages 543-555, November.
    8. Francesco Aiello & Vincenzo Scoppa, 2000. "Uneven Regional Development in Italy: Explaining Differences in Productivity Levels," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 59(2), pages 270-298, September.
    9. Kelley, Allen C. & Schmidt, Robert M., 1995. "Aggregate Population and Economic Growth Correlations: The Role of the Components of Demographic Change," Working Papers 95-37, Duke University, Department of Economics.
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