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Are Housing Bubbles Contagious? A Case Study of Las Vegas and Los Angeles Home Prices

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  • Mary Riddel

Abstract

This paper asks whether speculative house-price pressure in an economic center can spill into related housing markets. In other words, are bubbles contagious? I develop a theoretical model that allows for speculative price appreciation to spread from one market to another. I estimate an error-correction model using quarterly housing data for Las Vegas and Los Angeles and fundamental market variables from 1978 Quarter 2 through 2008 Quarter 1. Las Vegas prices show significant persistence and adjust slowly to disequilibrium. Contagious price and income growth from the Los Angeles market sustained by naïve expectations contributed to the bubble that formed in Las Vegas

Suggested Citation

  • Mary Riddel, 2011. "Are Housing Bubbles Contagious? A Case Study of Las Vegas and Los Angeles Home Prices," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(1), pages 126-144.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:87:y:2011:i:1:p:126-144
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ge, Jiaqi, 2013. "Endogenous Rise and Collapse of Housing Prices," Staff General Research Papers Archive 36279, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Jiaqi Ge, 2013. "Endogenous Formation and Collapse Of Housing Bubbles," Staff General Research Papers Archive 36277, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. repec:kap:jrefec:v:56:y:2018:i:4:d:10.1007_s11146-017-9605-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Jose Eduardo Gomez-Gonzalez & Juliana Gamboa-Arbeláez & Jorge Hirs-Garzón & Andrés Pinchao-Rosero, 2018. "When Bubble Meets Bubble: Contagion in OECD Countries," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 56(4), pages 546-566, May.
    5. MeiChi Huang, 2014. "Monetary policy implications of housing shift-contagion across regional markets," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(4), pages 589-608, October.
    6. Yang Hu & Les Oxley, 2016. "Bubbles in US Regional House Prices: Evidence from House Price/Income Ratios at the State Level," Working Papers in Economics 16/06, University of Waikato.
    7. Wang, Peijie & Brand, Steven, 2015. "A new approach to estimating value–income ratios with income growth and time-varying yields," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 242(1), pages 182-187.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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