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Open Space and Public Access: A Contingent Choice Application to Coastal Preservation

  • Michael P. McGonagle
  • Stephen K. Swallow

States and municipalities have committed over $24 billion in bond issues for land conservation in recent years, yet the structure of the land conservation industry and markets is poorly understood. Using a stated choice experiment survey, we examine the role of public access in willingness to pay (WTP) for coastal land conservation. We identify complex patterns in WTP, as related to level of access and to attitudes toward access and environmental protection. Our findings contribute to understanding market segments that may motivate heterogeneity in land conservation agents and that reveal opportunities to optimize conservation programs that serve heterogeneous populations.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/81/4/477
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:81:y:2005:i:4:p477-495
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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  1. Swallow, Stephen K., 1996. "Economic Issues In Ecosystem Management: An Introduction And Overview," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 25(2), October.
  2. Lynch, Lori & Musser, Wesley N., 1999. "A Relative Efficiency Analysis Of Farmland Preservation Programs," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21639, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  3. Bergstrom, John C. & Dillman, B. L. & Stoll, John R., 1985. "Public Environmental Amenity Benefits of Private Land: The Case of Prime Agricultural Land," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(01), pages 139-149, July.
  4. Opaluch James J. & Swallow Stephen K. & Weaver Thomas & Wessells Christopher W. & Wichelns Dennis, 1993. "Evaluating Impacts from Noxious Facilities: Including Public Preferences in Current Siting Mechanisms," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 41-59, January.
  5. Heidi J. Albers & Amy W. Ando, 2003. "Could State-Level Variation in the Number of Land Trusts Make Economic Sense?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(3), pages 311-327.
  6. Jiang, Yong & Swallow, Stephen K. & McGonagle, Michael P., 2004. "An Empirical Assessment Of Convergent Validity Of Benefit Transfer In Contingent Choice: Introductory Applications With New Criteria," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20040, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  7. Stephen K. Swallow & Thomas Weaver & James J. Opaluch & Thomas S. Michelman, 1994. "Heterogeneous Preferences and Aggregation in Environmental Policy Analysis: A Landfill Siting Case," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 76(3), pages 431-443.
  8. Johnston, Robert J. & Swallow, Stephen K. & Bauer, Dana Marie & Anderson, Christopher M., 2003. "Preferences for Residential Development Attributes and Support for the Policy Process: Implications for Management and Conservation of Rural Landscapes," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 32(1), April.
  9. Johnston, Robert J. & Weaver, Thomas F. & Smith, Lynn A. & Swallow, Stephen K., 1995. "Contingent Valuation Focus Groups: Insights From Ethnographic Interview Techniques," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 24(1), April.
  10. Rigoberto A. Lopez & Farhed A. Shah & Marilyn A. Altobello, 1994. "Amenity Benefits and the Optimal Allocation of Land," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 70(1), pages 53-62.
  11. W. Michael Hanemann, 1984. "Welfare Evaluations in Contingent Valuation Experiments with Discrete Responses," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 66(3), pages 332-341.
  12. Stephen K. Swallow & Michael P. McGonagle, 2006. "Public Funding of Environmental Amenities: Contingent Choices Using New Taxes or Existing Revenues for Coastal Land Conservation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 82(1), pages 56-67.
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