IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/tsy/journl/journl_tsy_er_2008_3_3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How much of the variation in literacy and numeracy can be explained by school performance?

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew Leigh

    (Treasury, Government of Australia)

  • Hector Thompson

    (Treasury, Government of Australia)

Abstract

Family background is known to have a substantial impact on students' literacy and numeracy results. This raises questions about whether any of the remaining differences in results are due to school performance — or whether they are merely due to random noise. This article reviews research from the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) study, based on student-level analysis. It then presents new evidence based on publicly reported school-level data from Western Australia. Combining test results with data on schools’ socioeconomic characteristics, this study estimates the degree to which some schools outperform those with similar characteristics. On a 'like schools' basis, school differences are shown to be persistent across subjects, grades and years.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Leigh & Hector Thompson, 2008. "How much of the variation in literacy and numeracy can be explained by school performance?," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 3, pages 63-78, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:tsy:journl:journl_tsy_er_2008_3_3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://archive.treasury.gov.au/documents/1421/PDF/05_Variation_Literacy_Numeracy_explained_by_School_Performance.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2005. "Does school accountability lead to improved student performance?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(2), pages 297-327.
    2. Eric A. Hanushek & Margaret E. Raymond, 2006. "School accountability and student performance," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 51-61.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    demographics; education; PISA; Programme for International Student Assessment; socioeconomic conditions;

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:tsy:journl:journl_tsy_er_2008_3_3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (The Treasury (Commonwealth of Australia)) or (Lisa Gilmore). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/trgovau.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.