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Educational attainment in Australia

  • Gene Tunny

    (Treasury, Government of Australia)

Registered author(s):

    Australians have increased their educational attainment over the past few decades, essentially catching up with their peers in the rest of the OECD. Although older Australians have lower upper secondary attainment, the educational attainment of young Australians is similar to the OECD average. With strong educational attainment among young Australians, the flow of younger well-educated cohorts into the working-age population will gradually improve Australia’s total stock of human capital. While it seems plausible to believe that such increases in measured educational attainment will benefit Australia’s economic performance, it is difficult to find statistical support for such a conclusion from a cross-country comparison of productivity and educational attainment.

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    File URL: http://archive.treasury.gov.au/documents/1107/PDF/01Educational.pdf
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    Article provided by The Treasury, Australian Government in its journal Economic Roundup.

    Volume (Year): (2006)
    Issue (Month): 2 (May)
    Pages: 1-9

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    Handle: RePEc:tsy:journl:journl_tsy_er_2006_2_1
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    1. Alan Krueger & Mikael Lindahl, 2000. "Education for Growth: Why and For Whom?," Working Papers 808, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    2. Jeff Borland, 2002. "New Estimates of the Private Rate of Return to University Education in Australia," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2002n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    3. Steve Dowrick, 2003. "Ideas and Education: Level or Growth Effects?," NBER Working Papers 9709, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. E. Paul Durrenberger, 2005. "Labour," Chapters, in: A Handbook of Economic Anthropology, chapter 8 Edward Elgar.
    5. Jyoti Rahman, 2005. "Comparing Australian and United States productivity," Economic Roundup, The Treasury, Australian Government, issue 2, pages 27-45, June.
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