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Empirics Of The Metropolitan Productivity Patterns In Europe

  • Christian LONGHI

    ()

    (GREDEG, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis,)

This paper focuses on the main European metropolitan areas and builds empirics on their evolution over the process of economic integration these last twenty years. These metropolitan areas are acknowledged to be the main engines of economic development in Europe, and to concentrate larger and larger shares of population, activities, R&D resources… Different theoretical frameworks have grounded these cumulative dynamics. Recently, regional and development policies have also based their action on these areas, through the concept of polycentricity for instance. The paper rests thus on a database of the forty main European cities over the period 1975-2000, disaggregated in twenty sectors of activity. First of all, the paper analyses the processes of convergence in terms of productivity or sectoral similarities at work between the different metropolitan areas as well as the evolution of their specialization in terms of value added or employment. An analytical framework is outlined thereafter, based on the rates of growth of productivity and employment, which allows us to define a dynamic view of this convergence process, and to map the dynamic comparative advantages of sectors in our metropolitan areas. In addition to the in-depth analysis of the cities, the results of these different steps show that the metropolitan areas are the main vectors of the process of European integration; a standard model of the metropolitan area seems to emerge as a result of this process.

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File URL: http://region-developpement.univ-tln.fr/fr/pdf/R27/Longhi.pdf
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Article provided by Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var in its journal Région et Développement.

Volume (Year): 27 (2008)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 61-82

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Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:27:y:2008:p:61-82
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  1. Christian Longhi & Antonio Musolesi, 2007. "European cities in the process of economic integration: towards structural convergence," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 41(2), pages 499-499, June.
  2. Paul Krugman & Anthony Venables, 1993. "Integration, Specialization, and the Adjustment," NBER Working Papers 4559, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  8. Juan R. Cuadrado-Roura & TomÂs Mancha-Navarro & RubÊn Garrido-Yserte, 2000. "Regional productivity patterns in Europe: An alternative approach," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 365-384.
  9. J. Vernon Henderson & Ari Kuncoro & Matthew Turner, 1992. "Industrial Development in Cities," NBER Working Papers 4178, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  11. Juan Cuadrado-Roura & Luis Rubalcaba-Bermejo, 1998. "Specialization and Competition amongst European Cities: A New Approach through Fair and Exhibition Activities," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 133-147.
  12. Philippe Martin, 1998. "Can Regional Policies Affect Growth and Geography in Europe?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(6), pages 757-774, 08.
  13. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Comparing Apples to Oranges: Productivity Convergence and Measurement across Industries and Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1216-38, December.
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  15. Quah, Danny T., 1996. "Empirics for economic growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1353-1375, June.
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