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Integration, Agglomeration and the Political Economics of Factor Mobility


  • Ottaviano, Gianmarco
  • Thisse, Jacques-François


This paper tackles the issue of the optimality of agglomeration in a two-region economy with skilled/mobile and unskilled/immobile workers. The market leads to the optimal outcome when transport costs are high or low. However, for intermediate values, it yields agglomeration whereas dispersion is socially desirable. We show that competitive lobbying on factor mobility by the two groups of workers sustains the second best optimum.

Suggested Citation

  • Ottaviano, Gianmarco & Thisse, Jacques-François, 1999. "Integration, Agglomeration and the Political Economics of Factor Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 2185, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2185

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Agglomeration; Integration; Mobility; Political Economy;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • R13 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General Equilibrium and Welfare Economic Analysis of Regional Economies
    • R38 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Government Policy


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