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Metropolitan Development And Cooperation In South-Eastern Europe


  • Paschalis ARVANITIDIS

    () (University of Thessaly, Greece)

  • George PETRAKOS

    (University of Thessaly, Greece)


This paper explores the role and importance of the four, closelocated, metropolises of south-eastern Europe (Skopje, Sofia, Thessaloniki and Tirana) and proposes a strategy that promotes metropolitan growth and development, maximizes spread effects to national hinterlands, and advances cross-country cooperation between cities in the area. These metropolitan centres play a significant role within both their respective countries and the whole region, because of their function as political/administrative centres and economic/growth poles and their dominance over the other national urban centres. In addition, their relative proximity permits the development of networks of cooperation and the gradual formation of a polycentric regional structure in south-eastern Europe, which will progressively embrace all the important cities, to increasing regional integration and enhancing economic development.

Suggested Citation

  • Paschalis ARVANITIDIS & George PETRAKOS, 2008. "Metropolitan Development And Cooperation In South-Eastern Europe," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 27, pages 133-159.
  • Handle: RePEc:tou:journl:v:27:y:2008:p:133-159

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. George Petrakos, 2002. "Restructuring, Stability, and Development in Southeastern Europe," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 3-5, July.
    2. Moomaw, Ronald L. & Shatter, Ali M., 1996. "Urbanization and Economic Development: A Bias toward Large Cities?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 13-37, July.
    3. George Petrakos, 2000. "Economic structure and change in the Balkan region: implications for integration, transition and economic cooperation," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 95-113, March.
    4. Garabed Minassian, 2002. "The Economic Environment in Albania, Bulgaria, Macedonia FYR, and Greece: A Cross-Country Study," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 45-82, July.
    5. Michel DIMOU & Alexandra SCHAFFAR, 2007. "Évolution Des Hiérarchies Urbaines Et Loi De Zipf : Le Cas Des Balkans," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 25, pages 65-86.
    6. Petrakos, George & Economou, Dimitri, 2002. "The spatial aspects of development in south-eastern Europe," ERSA conference papers ersa02p139, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Moulaert, Frank & Rodriguez, Arantxa & Swyngedouw, Erik (ed.), 2003. "The Globalized City: Economic Restructuring and Social Polarization in European Cities," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199260409, June.
    8. Guimaraes, Paulo & Figueiredo, Octavio & Woodward, Douglas, 2000. "Agglomeration and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment in Portugal," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 115-135, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dimitris Kallioras & Maria Tsiapa, 2015. "The Regional Dimension of Economic Growth in Ukraine," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 1(3), pages 71-95.

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    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes


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