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The spatial aspects of development in south-eastern Europe

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  • Petrakos, George

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  • Economou, Dimitri

Abstract

This paper analyses for the first time the spatial structure of south-eastern Europe in an effort to assess regional imbalances, border conditions, urban hierarchies and detect the adjustments of the region to the forces of integration and transition. The analysis is based on a unique data base compiled from national sources and is carried on with the use of statistical, diagrammatic and cartographic methods. The analysis shows that south-eastern Europe is characterized by increasing regional disparities, an increasingly superior performance of the metropolitan regions, serious discontinuities at the borders which have, in most cases, generated over-time border regions with below average performance and finally an urban system with serious deficiencies in medium sized cities. These findings suggest that regional policy should become a permanent ingredient of indigenous and international development initiatives, which need to pay a greater attention to the needs of border regions, encouraging and promoting programs and policies of cross-border cooperation.

Suggested Citation

  • Petrakos, George & Economou, Dimitri, 2002. "The spatial aspects of development in south-eastern Europe," ERSA conference papers ersa02p139, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa02p139
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    File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa02/cd-rom/papers/139.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. George Petrakos & Prodromos Mardakis & Helen Caraveli, 2000. "Recent developments in the Greek system of urban centres," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 27(2), pages 169-181, March.
    2. George Petrakos, 2000. "Economic structure and change in the Balkan region: implications for integration, transition and economic cooperation," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(1), pages 95-113, March.
    3. Károly Fazekas, 1996. "Types of Microregions, Dispersion of Unemployment, and Local Employment Development in Hungary," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 3-48, June.
    4. Mitko Dimitrov & George Petrakos & Stoyan Totev & Maria Tsiapa, 2003. "Cross-Border Cooperation in Southeastern Europe," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(6), pages 5-25, January.
    5. Garabed Minassian & Stoyan Totev, 1996. "The Bulgarian Economy in Transition Regional Aftereffects (Possibilities for Structural and Regional Redevelopment)," Eastern European Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 34(3), pages 49-92, June.
    6. George C. Petrakos, 1996. "The Regional Dimension of Transition in Central and East European Countries: An Assessment," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 5-38, October.
    7. George Petrakos, 2002. "The Balkans in the New European Economic Space: Problems of Adjustment and Policies of Development," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 6-30, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paschalis ARVANITIDIS & George PETRAKOS, 2008. "Metropolitan Development And Cooperation In South-Eastern Europe," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 27, pages 133-159.
    2. Scott W. Hegerty, 2016. "Regional Convergence and Growth Clusters in Central and Eastern Europe: An Examination of Sectoral-Level Data," Eastern European Business and Economics Journal, Eastern European Business and Economics Studies Centre, vol. 2(2), pages 95-110.
    3. Dimitris Kallioras & George Petrakos & Georgios Fotopoulos, 2005. "Economic integration, regional structural change and cohesion in the EU new member-states," ERSA conference papers ersa05p383, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Anna Iara & Iulia Traistaru, 2004. "Integration, Regional Specialization and Growth Differentials in EU Acceding Countries: Evidence from Hungary," ERSA conference papers ersa04p298, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Stoyan Totev, 2006. "Comparative Analysis of the Processes of Regional Specialization and Concentration in EU," Economic Studies journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 1, pages 67-89.

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