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A Stated Preference Study for a Car Ownership Model in the Context of Developing Countries

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  • M. Kumar
  • K. V. Krishna Rao

Abstract

A stated preference (SP) experiment of car ownership was conducted in Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR) of Maharashtra in India. A full factorial experiment was designed to considering various attributes such as travel time, travel cost, projected household income, car loan payment and servicing cost. Data on 357 individuals were collected which resulted in 3213 observations for the calibration of the work trip and recreational trip car ownership models. The car ownership alternatives considered 0, 1 and 2 cars. A multinomial logit framework was used to develop the car ownership model taking the household as a decision unit. The specification and results of the SP car ownership model are discussed. The observed and predicted values matched reasonably when the validity of the SP car ownership model was tested against revealed preference (RP) data. The car ownership models developed in this study exhibit a satisfactory goodness of fit. It is concluded that the SP modelling approach can be successfully used for modelling car ownership decisions of households in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Kumar & K. V. Krishna Rao, 2006. "A Stated Preference Study for a Car Ownership Model in the Context of Developing Countries," Transportation Planning and Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(5), pages 409-425, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:transp:v:29:y:2006:i:5:p:409-425
    DOI: 10.1080/03081060600917793
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert S. Pindyck, 1979. "The Structure of World Energy Demand," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262661772, January.
    2. M.E. Beesley & J.F. Kain, 1964. "Urban Form, Car Ownership and Public Policy: an Appraisal of Traffic in Towns," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 1(2), pages 174-203, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chiou, Yu-Chiun & Wen, Chieh-Hua & Tsai, Shih-Hsun & Wang, Wei-Ying, 2009. "Integrated modeling of car/motorcycle ownership, type and usage for estimating energy consumption and emissions," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 665-684, August.
    2. Jos Ommeren & Eva Gutiérrez-i-Puigarnau, 2013. "Distortionary company car taxation: deadweight losses through increased car ownership," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 1189-1204, December.
    3. Habibian, Meeghat & Kermanshah, Mohammad, 2013. "Coping with congestion: Understanding the role of simultaneous transportation demand management policies on commuters," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 229-237.
    4. Ahmadi Azari, Kian & Arintono, Sulistyo & Hamid, Hussain & Rahmat, Riza Atiq O.K., 2013. "Modelling demand under parking and cordon pricing policy," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 1-9.
    5. Kemal Çelik & Erkan Oktay & Muhsin Doğan Ebül & Ömer Özhancı, 2015. "Factors influencing consumers’ light commercial vehicle purchase intention in a developing country," Management & Marketing, De Gruyter Open, vol. 10(2), pages 148-162, September.

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