IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Geographical agglomeration: Ellison and Glaeser's index applied to the case of Belgian manufacturing industry

  • Luisito Bertinelli
  • Jehan Decrop

Bertinelli L. and Decrop J. (2005) Geographical agglomeration: Ellison and Glaeser's index applied to the case of Belgian manufacturing industry, Regional Studies 39 , 567-583. The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive discussion of the use of the Ellison and Glaeser index and subsequently to carry out a descriptive analysis of the geographical concentration of the manufacturing sector in Belgium. To assess the degree of concentration, individual plant data on wage and salary earners are used, with a relatively fine geographical breakdown (districts and townships). It is shown that more than 30% of the industries are excessively agglomerated.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Regional Studies.

Volume (Year): 39 (2005)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 567-583

in new window

Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:39:y:2005:i:5:p:567-583
Contact details of provider: Web page:

Order Information: Web:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Barrios, Salvador & Bertinelli, Luisito & Eric, Strobl & Antonio Carlos, Teixeira, 2003. "Agglomeration Economies and the Location of Industries: A comparison of Three small European Countries," MPRA Paper 5704, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Devereux, Michael P. & Griffith, Rachel & Simpson, Helen, 2002. "The Geographical Distribution of Production Activity in the UK," CEPR Discussion Papers 3627, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Gilles Duranton & Henry G. Overman, 2002. "Testing for localisation using micro-geographic data," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20071, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  4. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1998. "Innovation in Cities: Science-Based Diversity, Specialization and Localized Competition," CEPR Discussion Papers 1980, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Ciccone, Antonio & Hall, Robert E, 1996. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 54-70, March.
  6. Björn Alecke & Christoph Alsleben & Frank Scharr & Gerhard Untiedt, 2003. "Evidence on the Geographic Concentration of German Industries: Do High-Tech Clusters Really Matter?," Discussion Papers in Economics 03_04, University of Dortmund, Department of Economics.
  7. Thomas J. Holmes & John J. Stevens, 2002. "Geographic Concentration and Establishment Scale," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 682-690, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:39:y:2005:i:5:p:567-583. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.