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The Impact of Industrial Market Access Negotiations on African Economies


  • Hakim Ben Hammouda
  • Stephen Karingi
  • Nassim Oulmane
  • Mustapha Sadni Jallab


This paper proposes an extensive data simulation exercise on the likely impact of non-agricultural market access liberalization. The paper analyses real options for tariff cut reduction, special and differential treatment and the treatment of unbound tariffs. This paper also gives indications concerning the likely economic impact of this trade round of industrial market access negotiations on African economies. It shows that an ambitious tariff cut reduction formula would provide greater access to developed country markets for African producers. However, this kind of formula has a major drawback for African countries in the sense that it could accelerate the de-industrialization of African countries and limit incentives to diversify their economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakim Ben Hammouda & Stephen Karingi & Nassim Oulmane & Mustapha Sadni Jallab, 2008. "The Impact of Industrial Market Access Negotiations on African Economies," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 187-208.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:36:y:2008:i:2:p:187-208 DOI: 10.1080/13600810802040898

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    References listed on IDEAS

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