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Macroeconomic variability in New Zealand: An SVAR study

Listed author(s):
  • Paul Conway

Structural vector autoregressive (SVAR) methodology is used to assess possible sources of macroeconomic variability in the New Zealand economy. As a test of robustness, two alternative business cycle filters are used to remove stochastic trends from integrated time series data. Regardless of the way in which cyclical fluctuations are empirically measured, the investigation attributes a considerable share of variability in the New Zealand macroeconomy to foreign sector shocks, particularly over the longer term. Furthermore, the relative importance of the various sources of variability are found to change following the removal of nominal interest rate and other controls and the floating of the New Zealand dollar in the mid-1980s.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00779959809544287
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal New Zealand Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 32 (1998)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 161-186

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Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:32:y:1998:i:2:p:161-186
DOI: 10.1080/00779959809544287
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RNZP20

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  1. Mendoza, Enrique G, 1995. "The Terms of Trade, the Real Exchange Rate, and Economic Fluctuations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(1), pages 101-137, February.
  2. Marianne Baxter & Robert G. King, 1999. "Measuring Business Cycles: Approximate Band-Pass Filters For Economic Time Series," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 575-593, November.
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  7. Orden, David & Fisher, Lance A, 1993. "Financial Deregulation and the Dynamics of Money, Prices, and Output in New Zealand and Australia," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 273-292, May.
  8. Genberg, Hans & Salemi, Michael K. & Swoboda, Alexander, 1987. "The relative importance of foreign and domestic disturbances for aggregate fluctuations in the open economy : Switzerland, 1964-1981," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 45-67, January.
  9. King, Robert G. & Rebelo, Sergio T., 1993. "Low frequency filtering and real business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 17(1-2), pages 207-231.
  10. Gruen, David & Romalis, John & Chandra, Naveen, 1999. "The Lags of Monetary Policy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 75(230), pages 280-294, September.
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