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Trans-Tasman Transmission of Monetary Shocks: Evidence From a VAR Approach

  • K. Arin
  • Sam Jolly

This paper investigates the cross-country transmission mechanisms of monetary shocks between Australia and New Zealand within a VAR framework for the period 1985:1–2003:4. The empirical results indicate that a monetary shock in either Australia or New Zealand has real effects in the short-run in both countries however, an Australian shock generates more significant responses of most variables. Australian output is found to be significantly more sensitive than New Zealand output to monetary innovations in either country. The results also suggest that monetary innovations in a small open economy can also influence its larger trading partner. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2005

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11293-005-8171-y
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Article provided by International Atlantic Economic Society in its journal Atlantic Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 33 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 267-283

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Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:33:y:2005:i:3:p:267-283
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  1. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
  2. Ben S. Bernanke & Alan S. Blinder, 1989. "The federal funds rate and the channels of monetary transmission," Working Papers 89-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  3. Paul Conway, 1998. "Macroeconomic variability in New Zealand: An SVAR study," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 161-186.
  4. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles, 1996. "The Effects of Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from the Flow of Funds," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 16-34, February.
  5. Robert A Buckle & Kunhong Kim & Heather Kirkham & Nathan McLellan & Jared Sharma, 2002. "A structural VAR model of the New Zealand business cycle," Treasury Working Paper Series 02/26, New Zealand Treasury.
  6. Jill Ann Holman & Rebecca Neumann, 2002. "Evidence on the cross-country transmission of monetary shocks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(15), pages 1837-1857.
  7. Dungey, Mardi & Pagan, Adrian, 2000. "A Structural VAR Model of the Australian Economy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 76(235), pages 321-42, December.
  8. David O. Cushman & Tao Zha, 1995. "Identifying monetary policy in a small open economy under flexible exchange rates," Working Paper 95-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  9. Kim, Soyoung & Roubini, Nouriel, 2000. "Exchange rate anomalies in the industrial countries: A solution with a structural VAR approach," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 561-586, June.
  10. Strongin, Steven, 1995. "The identification of monetary policy disturbances explaining the liquidity puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 463-497, June.
  11. Vittorio Grilli & Nouriel Roubini, 1995. "Liquidity and Exchange Rates: Puzzling Evidence from the G-7 Countries," Working Papers 95-17, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  12. P. Joyce, Joseph & Kamas, Linda, 1994. "Money and output under alternative exchange rate regimes in the USA," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(6), pages 679-697, December.
  13. Robert A Buckle & Kunhong Kim & Nathan McLellan, 2003. "The impact of monetary policy on New Zealand business cycles and inflation variability," Treasury Working Paper Series 03/09, New Zealand Treasury.
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