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Globalization, technical change and the skill premium: magnification effects from human - capital investments

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  • Jurgen Meckl
  • Benjamin Weigert

Abstract

This paper shows that endogenous adjustments in the composition of labour supplies magnify the effects of changes in commodity prices on the measured skill premium under quite plausible conditions. These composition effects arise from decisions of individuals with heterogeneous inherent abilities about acquiring human capital. They reinforce the well-known Stolper - Samuelson effect on the measured skill premium in countries with a sufficiently high relative supply of skilled labour, but compensate them otherwise. As a result, the model can account for the observation of a worldwide increase in the skill premium during the last two decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Jurgen Meckl & Benjamin Weigert, 2003. "Globalization, technical change and the skill premium: magnification effects from human - capital investments," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 319-336.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:12:y:2003:i:4:p:319-336
    DOI: 10.1080/0963819032000154784
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert C. Feenstra & Gordon H. Hanson, 1995. "Foreign Investment, Outsourcing and Relative Wages," NBER Working Papers 5121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Weigert, Benjamin & Klemm, Marcus, 2015. "Composition matters! Wage inequality and the demographic and educational structure of the labor force in Germany," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 112914, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Klemm, Marcus & Weigert, Benjamin, 2014. "Does composition matter? Wage inequality and the demographic and educational structure of the labor force in Gemany," Working Papers 06/2014, German Council of Economic Experts / Sachverständigenrat zur Begutachtung der gesamtwirtschaftlichen Entwicklung.
    3. Jürgen Meckl, 2006. "Does European Unemployment Prop Up American Wages? National Labor Markets and Global Trade: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1924-1930, December.

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