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Impact evaluation of infrastructure interventions

Author

Listed:
  • Henrik Hansen
  • Ole Winckler Andersen
  • Howard White

Abstract

The focus on results in development agencies has led to increased focus on impact evaluation to demonstrate the effectiveness of development programmes. A range of methods are available for counterfactual analysis of infrastructure interventions, as illustrated by the variety of papers in this volume. Understanding impact means understanding the context in which an intervention takes place and the channels through which the impact on outcomes is expected to occur. Such analysis typically requires mixing both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The analysis will also anticipate heterogeneity, with conditioning for 'selection bias' being recognised as positive information about for whom and when an intervention works or not.

Suggested Citation

  • Henrik Hansen & Ole Winckler Andersen & Howard White, 2011. "Impact evaluation of infrastructure interventions," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:3:y:2011:i:1:p:1-8
    DOI: 10.1080/19439342.2011.547659
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sonali Senaratna Sellamuttu & Takeshi Aida & Ryuji Kasahara & Yasuyuki Sawada & Deeptha Wijerathna, 2014. "How Access to Irrigation Influences Poverty and Livelihoods: A Case Study from Sri Lanka," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(5), pages 748-768, May.
    2. Peters, Jörg, 2016. "Infrastructure and poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa: A review," Ruhr Economic Papers 628, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    3. Yoshino, Naoyuki & Pontines, Victor, 2015. "The “Highway Effect” on Public Finance: Case of the STAR Highway in the Philippines," ADBI Working Papers 549, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    4. Senaratna Sellamuttu, Sonali, 2013. "How access to irrigation influences poverty and livelihoods: a case study from Sri Lanka. Impact assessment of infrastructure projects on poverty reduction," IWMI Working Papers H045795, International Water Management Institute.

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