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Dynamic and long-term linkages among agricultural and non-agricultural growth, inequality and poverty in developing countries

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  • Katsushi S. Imai
  • Wenya Cheng
  • Raghav Gaiha

Abstract

Drawing upon cross-country panel data for developing countries, the present study examines the role of agricultural growth in reducing inequality and poverty by modelling the dynamic linkage between agricultural and non-agricultural sectors. For this purpose, we have compared the roles of agricultural and non-agricultural growth and have found that agricultural growth is more important in reducing poverty, while the negative effect of agricultural growth on inequality is found in a few cases where specific definitions of inequality are adopted. Our analysis generally reinforces the case for revival of agriculture in the post-2015 discourse, contrary to much-emphasised roles of rural–urban migration and urbanisation as main drivers of growth and elimination of extreme poverty.

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  • Katsushi S. Imai & Wenya Cheng & Raghav Gaiha, 2017. "Dynamic and long-term linkages among agricultural and non-agricultural growth, inequality and poverty in developing countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 318-338, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:318-338
    DOI: 10.1080/02692171.2016.1249833
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    Cited by:

    1. Dhahri, Sabrine & Omri, Anis, 2020. "Foreign capital towards SDGs 1 & 2—Ending Poverty and hunger: The role of agricultural production," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 208-221.
    2. Katsushi S. Imai, 2017. "Roles of Agricultural Transformation in Achieving Sustainable Development Goals on Poverty, Hunger, Productivity, and Inequality," Discussion Paper Series DP2017-26, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    3. Kulkarni, Varsha S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2021. "Beyond Piketty: A new perspective on poverty and inequality in India," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 317-336.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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