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How best to link poverty reduction and debt sustainability in IMF-World Bank models?

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  • Sushanta Mallick
  • Brigitte Granville

Abstract

This paper attempts to provide an economic model in the context of developing countries to address the policy strategies related to poverty reduction. With a view to deal with the shortcomings of the existing approaches as regards poverty reduction, this paper develops a model on the basis of the policy framework of the IMF and the World Bank to show how demand growth can be a crucial mechanism in determining the potential rate of growth, and then to suggest ways in which poverty—conceptualised officially in absolute terms with a subjective cut-off point (e.g. US $1/$2 a day), and a new objective measure in terms of consumption deprivation—can be linked with the key policy variables contained in the adjustment programmes. A strategy of investment in infrastructure and in human development, and improving access to credit markets, particularly in rural areas to encourage or 'crowd in' private investment is a precondition for growth and poverty alleviation. Debt relief can only provide a temporary, not a sustainable, solution to the problem of reducing poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Sushanta Mallick & Brigitte Granville, 2005. "How best to link poverty reduction and debt sustainability in IMF-World Bank models?," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 67-85.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:19:y:2005:i:1:p:67-85
    DOI: 10.1080/0269217042000312614
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eliana Cardoso, 1992. "Inflation and Poverty," NBER Working Papers 4006, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Santonu Basu, 2002. "Financial Liberalization and Intervention," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2691.
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    7. Lisandro Abrego & Doris C. Ross, 2001. "Debt Relief Under the HIPC Initiative: Context and Outlook for Debt Sustainability and Resource Flows," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2001-96, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
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    Cited by:

    1. Sushanta Mallick & Tomoe Moore, 2008. "Foreign Capital in a Growth Model," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 143-159, February.
    2. Sushanta K. Mallick, 2014. "Disentangling the Poverty Effects of Sectoral Output, Prices, and Policies in India," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(4), pages 773-801, December.
    3. Mallick, Sushanta & Moore, Tomoe, 2005. "Impact of World Bank lending in an adjustment-led growth model," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 366-383, December.
    4. Luca Agnello & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2014. "How Does Fiscal Consolidation Impact on Income Inequality?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(4), pages 702-726, December.
    5. Salem Kanoun, 2012. "Linkages Between Fiscal Debt Sustainability, Growth And Poverty: An Application To Tunisia," Book Chapters, in: João Sousa Andrade & Marta C. N. Simões & Ivan Stosic & Dejan Eric & Hasan Hanic (ed.), Managing Structural Changes - Trends and Requirements, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 12, pages 214-249, Institute of Economic Sciences.
    6. Zhang, Yin-Fang & Ji, Shengbao, 2018. "Does infrastructure have a transitory or longer-term impact? Evidence from China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 195-207.
    7. Fredj Jawadi & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2012. "Consumption and Wealth in the US, the UK and the Euro Area:A Nonlinear Investigation," NIPE Working Papers 24/2012, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.

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