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Are business cycles independent in the G7?


  • Philip Bodman
  • Mark Crosby


In this paper we examine the relationships between business cycles in the G7 countries. We focus on whether recessionary periods in one country are independent of the timing of recessions in other countries in the G7, using three different methods for dating recessions. We find that the evidence is mixed on whether phases of the business cycle in North America and in European countries are independent, or whether there is a common phase structure in the business cycle across all the G7 economies. NBER dates suggest that business cycles are synchronised, while other methods for generating business cycle chronologies are more consistent with regional, rather than international cycles. We also find mixed evidence on whether the UK is synchronised with European countries, while Japan quite clearly has the cycle that is most independent of other G7 countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Bodman & Mark Crosby, 2005. "Are business cycles independent in the G7?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 483-499.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:19:y:2005:i:4:p:483-499 DOI: 10.1080/10168730500381917

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Frankel, Jeffrey A & Rose, Andrew K, 1998. "The Endogeneity of the Optimum Currency Area Criteria," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(449), pages 1009-1025, July.
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    7. Artis, Michael J & Zhang, Wenda, 1999. "Further Evidence on the International Business Cycle and the ERM: Is There a European Business Cycle?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(1), pages 120-132, January.
    8. Inklaar, Robert & de Haan, Jakob, 2001. "Is There Really a European Business Cycle? A Comment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 215-220, April.
    9. Canova, Fabio, 1994. "Detrending and turning points," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(3-4), pages 614-623, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xi, Ning & Muneepeerakul, Rachata & Azaele, Sandro & Wang, Yougui, 2014. "Maximum entropy model for business cycle synchronization," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 413(C), pages 189-194.
    2. Firouz Fallahi & Gabriel Rodríguez, 2007. "Using Markov-Switching Models to Identify the Link between Unemployment and Criminality," Working Papers 0701E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.

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    G7; business cycles; recessions;

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