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Gender Roles and Labor Use Strategies: Women's Part-Time Work in the European Union

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  • Kea Tijdens

Abstract

What is the nature of female part-time employment in the European Union? Using data from the Second European Survey on Working Conditions , the author seeks to address this question. The paper examines four regimes of part-time employment. The gender-roles model, which assumes that women work parttime because they are secondary earners or have children at home, ranks first as a predictor of the likelihood that a woman will work part-time. In the responsive firms model, which ranks second in explanatory power, part-time work is primarily seen as the firms' response to workers' demands for fewer working hours. The optimal staffing model assumes that employers will create part-time jobs as a response to the demand for time-related services; it ranks third in explanatory power. Finally, the secondary-labor market model, which assumes job insecurity, poor wages, and poor working conditions, ranks fourth in predicting whether a woman will work part- or full-time.

Suggested Citation

  • Kea Tijdens, 2002. "Gender Roles and Labor Use Strategies: Women's Part-Time Work in the European Union," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 71-99.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:8:y:2002:i:1:p:71-99
    DOI: 10.1080/13545700210126553
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jill Rubery & Mark Smith & Colette Fagan, 1998. "National Working-Time Regimes and Equal Opportunities," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 71-101.
    2. Birgit Pfau-Effinger, 1993. "Modernisation, Culture and Part-Time Employment: The Example of Finland and West Germany," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 7(3), pages 383-410, September.
    3. Danièle Meulders & Olivier Plasman & Robert Plasman, 1994. "Atypical employment in the EC," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13464, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:aia:aiaswp:wp45 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Kaiser, Lutz C., 2006. "Female Labor Market Transitions in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 2115, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 246-253.
    4. Zwickl, Klara & Disslbacher, Franziska & Stagl, Sigrid, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economic Papers 4564, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    5. Florence Jaumotte, 2003. "Female Labour Force Participation: Past Trends and Main Determinants in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 376, OECD Publishing.
    6. repec:aia:aiaswp:147 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Caviris, Nicole Stefanie, 2014. "Educational attainment, college major choice, the gender wage gap, and average starting salaries of college graduates in the United States, 1967-2011," ISU General Staff Papers 201401010800004865, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Hu, Yongjian & Tijdens, Kea, 2003. "Choices for part-time jobs and the impacts on the wage differentials. A comparative study for Great Britain and the Netherlands," IRISS Working Paper Series 2003-05, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    9. Florence Jaumotte, 2005. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail : Évidence empirique sur le rôle des politiques économiques et autres déterminants dans les pays de l'OCDE," Revue économique de l'OCDE, Éditions OCDE, vol. 2003(2), pages 57-123.
    10. Jenny Willson & Andy Dickerson, 2010. "Part time employment and happiness: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2010021, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2010.
    11. Tanja Hethey & Margarita Estévez-Abe, 2008. "How Policies Affect Women's Economic Position within the Family: Labor Market Institutions and Wives' Contribution to Household Income," LIS Working papers 505, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    12. Magdalena M. Muszynska, 2004. "Employment after childbearing: a comparative study of Italy and Norway," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-030, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2015. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," Ecological Economics Papers ieep4, Institute of Ecological Economics.
    14. Robert Drago & David Black & Mark Wooden, 2004. "Gender and Work Hours Transitions in Australia: Drop Ceilings and Trap-Door Floors," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n11, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    15. DeRiviere, Linda, 2008. "Have we come a long way? Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics to revisit the 'pin money' theory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2340-2367, December.
    16. repec:aia:aiaswp:wp43 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. repec:aia:aiaswp:wp36 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Klara Zwickl & Franziska Disslbacher & Sigrid Stagl, 2016. "Work-sharing for a sustainable economy," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 111, WWWforEurope.

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