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The relative generosity of the EU-15 members states' child policies

  • Jérôme De Henau
  • Danièle Meulders
  • Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai
  • Hélène Périvier

The main purpose of this project is to analyse the influence of labour market conditions and social policies on the fertility decisions of young people in order to contribute to the design of better policies at European and national levels to facilitate combination of parenthood and work. Chapter I presents a broader picture on women’s current labour force participation according to motherhood status in the 15 countries of the former EU. The chapter also discusses related European Union policies. More in particular, the chapter examines the influence of the presence of children on labour force participation of women in comparison with that of men. It further explains how men and women allocate differently their time between paid and unpaid work, for example, housework and childcare activities. The chapter finally looks at the influence of the presence of children on wages of men and women. The most important policy-relevant finding is that labour market policies should be aimed to encourage women’s participation by reducing the costs of working, while social policies should help women to better reconcile work and motherhood. In particular European countries where less women work need more flexible labour markets (with more part-time and self-employment opportunities, without wage penalty), more husbands sharing responsibilities in domestic tasks, especially when there are children and public policies to increase childcare services, the length and co-division with the partner of parental leaves. Chapter II shows a summary of the detailed and in-depth analyses of those state interventions that are likely to affect women’s fertility decisions and the opportunities for women with children to work in the market. Particularly, the chapter explains the indicators that measure each EU-15 member state’s generosity in each of the three fields of family friendly policies, namely public childcare, care leaves (maternity and paternity leaves) and child tax and cash benefits. The

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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series ULB Institutional Repository with number 2013/9293.

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Date of creation: 2004
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Handle: RePEc:ulb:ulbeco:2013/9293
Note: Sponsorship: European Commission
Contact details of provider: Postal: CP135, 50, avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Bruxelles
Web page: http://difusion.ulb.ac.be

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  1. Maria Jepsen & Sile Padraigin O'Dorchai & Robert Plasman & François Rycx, 2005. "The wage penalty induced by part-time work: the case of Belgium," DULBEA Working Papers 05-17, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. Siv Gustafsson & Seble Worku, 2005. "Assortative Mating by Education and Postponement of Couple Formation and First Birth in Britain and Sweden," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 3(1), pages 91-113, November.
  3. Albrecht, James W. & Edin, Per-Anders & Sundström, Marianne & Vroman, Susan B., 1996. "Career Interruptions and Subsequent Earnings: A Reexamination Using Swedish Data," Working Paper Series 1996:23, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  4. Letablier, Marie-Th駻鑚e, 2003. "Fertility and Family Policies in France," Discussion Paper 160, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  5. Bettio, Francesca & Villa, Paola, 1998. "A Mediterranean Perspective on the Breakdown of the Relationship between Participation and Fertility," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 137-71, March.
  6. Cécile Wetzels & Aslan Zorlu, 2003. "Wage effects of motherhood: a double selection approach," NIMA Working Papers 22, Núcleo de Investigação em Microeconomia Aplicada (NIMA), Universidade do Minho.
  7. Robert Plasman & Salimata Sissoko Ndeye, 2005. "The gender wage gap in an international perspective," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 48(4), pages 419-442.
  8. Danièle Meulders & Olivier Plasman & Robert Plasman, 1994. "Atypical employment in the EC," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/13464, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Del Boca, Daniela & Locatelli, Marilena & Vuri, Daniela, 2004. "Child Care Choices by Italian Households," IZA Discussion Papers 983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. repec:ese:iserwp:2003-16 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Emilia Del Bono & Massimiliano Bratti, 2004. "Work Attachment Of New Mothers: The Role Of Human Capital, Employment Stability And Job Protection In Italy," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 17, Royal Economic Society.
  12. Miriam Beblo & Elke Wolf, 2002. "How much does a year off cost? Estimating the wage effects of employment breaks and part-time periods," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 45(2), pages 191-217.
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