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Technological progress and scientific indicators: a panel data analysis

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  • Ceyhun Elgin
  • Selman Çakır

Abstract

Total factor productivity (TFP) is generally interpreted to be a proxy for technological advancement. In this paper, we use stochastic frontier analysis to decompose the growth in TFP into three components: technological progress, scale effect and change in technical efficiency. Then, we conduct a comprehensive panel data analysis using the technological progress component of the TFP growth and several scientific and technological indicators using data from 160 countries over the period from 1960 to 2009. Our results generally show that the technological progress component of the TFP growth properly reflects certain dimensions of actual scientific and technological progress. However, we also find that this result is somewhat sensitive to different econometric specifications and assumptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Ceyhun Elgin & Selman Çakır, 2015. "Technological progress and scientific indicators: a panel data analysis," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(3), pages 263-281, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:24:y:2015:i:3:p:263-281
    DOI: 10.1080/10438599.2014.938573
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    1. Hidemichi Fujii & Akihiko Shinozaki & Shigemi Kagawa & Shunsuke Managi, 2019. "How Does Information and Communication Technology Capital Affect Productivity in the Energy Sector? New Evidence from 14 Countries, Considering the Transition to Renewable Energy Systems," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(9), pages 1-16, May.
    2. Kemal Soyer & Hale Ozgit & Husam Rjoub, 2020. "Applying an Evolutionary Growth Theory for Sustainable Economic Development: The Effect of International Students as Tourists," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(1), pages 1-20, January.

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