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Regional differences in job satisfaction

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  • Richard Jones
  • Peter Sloane

Abstract

Job satisfaction is significantly higher in Wales than in London and the South East, the rest of England and Scotland. This is despite the fact that among these four regions, earnings are lowest in Wales. Using data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), we investigate the determinants of job satisfaction and attempt to explain why workers in Wales are happier in their work than workers in other parts of the UK. We find that workers in Wales appear to be less concerned about pay than workers in other regions. We suggest that because lower earnings tend to be associated with higher levels of unemployment and inactivity, being in work may be regarded more favourably in more economically depressed regions. We also suggest the climate of industrial relations, as perceived by workers, is better in Wales than elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Jones & Peter Sloane, 2009. "Regional differences in job satisfaction," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 1019-1041.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:41:y:2009:i:8:p:1019-1041
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840601019067
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Drinkwater & Peter Ingram, 2005. "Have Industrial Relations in the UK Really Improved?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 19(2), pages 373-398, June.
    2. Kristensen, Nicolai & WestergÄrd-Nielsen, Niels C., 2004. "Does Low Job Satisfaction Lead to Job Mobility?," IZA Discussion Papers 1026, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Stephen Drinkwater & David Blackaby, 2004. "Migration and Labour Market Differences: The Case of Wales," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0604, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2013. "Trial experience, satisfaction and incentive to bring another lawsuit: Does aspiration level influence winners and losers?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 125-131.
    2. Arthur Grimes & Marc Reinhardt, 2015. "Relative Income and Subjective Wellbeing: Intra-national and Inter-national Comparisons by Settlement and Country Type," Working Papers 15_10, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    3. Hauff, Sven & Richter, Nicole Franziska & Tressin, Tabea, 2015. "Situational job characteristics and job satisfaction: The moderating role of national culture," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 710-723.
    4. Damiano Fiorillo & Nunzia Nappo, 2014. "Job satisfaction in Italy: individual characteristics and social relations," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(8), pages 683-704, August.

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