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Academic interactions among classroom peers: a cross-country comparison using TIMSS

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  • Changhui Kang

Abstract

Using an international data set from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), we examine academic interactions among classroom peers for each country, and compare them across different countries. To minimize the bias that usually plagues peer effects studies, we take within-student differences between mathematics and science test scores. The results show a significantly positive association between peers' performance and own achievement for most of the TIMSS countries. Moreover, the degree of mutual peer interactions within classroom is found to be surprisingly close across different countries, even if there exists a wide range of institutional differences in middle-school education (e.g. degree of ability mixing).

Suggested Citation

  • Changhui Kang, 2007. "Academic interactions among classroom peers: a cross-country comparison using TIMSS," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(12), pages 1531-1544.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:39:y:2007:i:12:p:1531-1544
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600606328
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tommaso Agasisti & Patrizia Falzetti, 2017. "Between-classes sorting within schools and test scores: an empirical analysis of Italian junior secondary schools," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 64(1), pages 1-45, March.
    2. Masakazu Hojo & Takashi Oshio, 2012. "What Factors Determine Student Performance in East Asia? New Evidence from the 2007 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 26(4), pages 333-357, December.
    3. Salvador Contreras & Frank Badua & Mitchell Adrian, 2012. "Peer Effects on Undergraduate Business Student Performance," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(1), pages 57-66.

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