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Parity reversion persistence in real exchange rates: middle income country case

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  • L. Achy

Abstract

This article investigates purchasing power parity (PPP) in the specific context of middle income countries. To circumvent the low power of traditional stationarity tests (Augmented Dickey-Fuller and Phillips-Perron tests), it performs variance ratio and fractional integration tests in addition to Perron's test that accounts for potential structural changes in real exchange rate processes. Beyond estimating half-life shocks to PPP, this article attempts to explain these estimates using a set of country specific variables as suggested by economic theory. The evidence suggests that reversion to parity tends to be faster in high inflation countries and that productivity improvement leads to a higher level of persistence. Openness to trade tends to reduce the extent of deviations from parity but this result does not appear to be statistically robust. Evidence shows also that deviations are less persistent under a fixed exchange rate regime and under unrestricted capital mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • L. Achy, 2003. "Parity reversion persistence in real exchange rates: middle income country case," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 541-553.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:35:y:2003:i:5:p:541-553
    DOI: 10.1080/0003684022000015937
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Shang-Jin Wei & David C. Parsley, 1995. "Purchasing Power Disparity During the Floating Rate Period: Exchange Rate Volatility, Trade Barriers and Other Culprits," NBER Working Papers 5032, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Salah A. Nusair, 2003. "Testing The Validity Of Purchasing Power Parity For Asian Countries During The Current Float," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 129-147, December.
    2. Michael Curran & Adnan Velic, 2016. "Real Exchange Rate Persistence and Country Characteristics," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 31, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    3. Arize, Augustine C. & Malindretos, John & Ghosh, Dilip, 2015. "Purchasing power parity-symmetry and proportionality: Evidence from 116 countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 69-85.
    4. Guneratne Banda Wickremasinghe, 2004. "Purchasing Power Parity Hypothesis in Developing Economies:Some Empirical Evidence from Sri Lanka," International Finance 0406005, EconWPA.
    5. Paresh Kumar Narayan, 2006. "Are bilateral real exchange rates stationary? Evidence from Lagrange multiplier unit root tests for India," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 63-70.
    6. Baharumshah, Ahmad Zubaidi & Chan, Tze-Haw & Aggarwal, Raj, 2006. "The Changing Dynamics of the East Asian Real Exchange Rates after the Financial Crisis: Further Evidence on Mean Reversion," MPRA Paper 6090, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 22 Nov 2007.
    7. Marcos José Dal Bianco, 2008. "Argentinean real exchange rate 1900-2006, test purchasing power parity theory," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 35(1 Year 20), pages 33-64, June.
    8. Tastan Huseyin, 2005. "Do real exchange rates contain a unit root? Evidence from Turkish data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(17), pages 2037-2053.
    9. Narayan Paresh K & Prasad Biman Chand, 2005. "The Validity of Purchasing Power Parity Hypothesis for Eleven Middle Eastern Countries," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 3(2), pages 44-58, August.
    10. Guneratne B. Wickremasinghe, 2005. "Purchasing Power Parity of Papua New Guinea: evidence from the floating exchange rate regime," Applied Financial Economics Letters, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 1(6), pages 335-338, November.

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