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The Greek implied volatility index: construction and properties

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  • George Skiadopoulos

Abstract

There is a growing literature on implied volatility indices in developed markets. However, no similar research has been conducted in the context of emerging markets. In this paper, an implied volatility index (GVIX) is constructed for the fast developing Greek derivatives market. Next, the properties of GVIX are explored. In line with earlier results, GVIX can be interpreted as a gauge of the investor's sentiment. In addition, it is found that the underlying stock market can forecast the future movements of GVIX. However, the reverse relationship does not hold. Finally, a contemporaneous spillover between GVIX and the US volatility indices VXO and VXN is detected. The results have implications for portfolio management.

Suggested Citation

  • George Skiadopoulos, 2004. "The Greek implied volatility index: construction and properties," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(16), pages 1187-1196.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:14:y:2004:i:16:p:1187-1196
    DOI: 10.1080/0960310042000280438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ser-Huang Poon & Peter, F. Pope, 2000. "Trading volatility spreads: a test of index option market efficiency," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 6(2), pages 235-260.
    2. Franck Moraux & Patrick Navatte & Christophe Villa, 1999. "The Predictive Power of the French Market Volatility Index: A Multi Horizons Study," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 2(3), pages 303-320.
    3. Harvey, Campbell R & Whaley, Robert E, 1991. " S&P 100 Index Option Volatility," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1251-1261, September.
    4. George Skiadopoulos & Stewart Hodges & Les Clewlow, 2000. "The Dynamics of the S&P 500 Implied Volatility Surface," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 3(3), pages 263-282, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. R. López & E. Navarro, 2013. "Interest rate and stock return volatility indices for the Eurozone. Investors' gauges of fear during the recent financial crisis," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(18), pages 1419-1432, September.
    2. Nelson Areal & Maria Cortez & Florinda Silva, 2013. "The conditional performance of US mutual funds over different market regimes: do different types of ethical screens matter?," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 27(4), pages 397-429, December.
    3. Costas Siriopoulos & Athanasios Fassas, 2013. "Dynamic relations of uncertainty expectations: a conditional assessment of implied volatility indices," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 233-266, October.
    4. Siriopoulos, Costas & Fassas, Athanasios, 2012. "An investor sentiment barometer — Greek Implied Volatility Index (GRIV)," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 77-93.
    5. Elyas Elyasiani & Luca Gambarelli & Silvia Muzzioli, 2015. "Towards a skewness index for the Italian stock market," Department of Economics 0064, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Supachok Thakolsri & Yuthana Sethapramote & Komain Jiranyakul, 2016. "Relationship of the Change in Implied Volatility with the Underlying Equity Index Return in Thailand," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 6(2), pages 74-86, December.
    7. Yue Peng & Wing Ng, 2012. "Analysing financial contagion and asymmetric market dependence with volatility indices via copulas," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 49-74, February.
    8. Nave, Juan M. & Ruiz, Javier, 2015. "Risk aversion and monetary policy in a global context," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 14-35.
    9. Yang-Cheng Lu & Yu-Chen Wei & Chien-Wei Chang, 2012. "Nonlinear Dynamics Between the Investor Fear Gauge and Market Index in the Emerging Taiwan Equity Market," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(0), pages 171-191, January.
    10. Yang-Cheng Lu & Yu-Chen Wei & Chien-Wei Chang, 2012. "Nonlinear Dynamics Between the Investor Fear Gauge and Market Index in the Emerging Taiwan Equity Market," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(0), pages 171-191, January.
    11. Wagner, Niklas & Szimayer, Alexander, 2004. "Local and spillover shocks in implied market volatility: evidence for the U.S. and Germany," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 237-251, September.
    12. Maria Gonzalez-Perez & Alfonso Novales, 2011. "The information content in a volatility index for Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 185-216, June.
    13. Bugge, Sebastian A. & Guttormsen, Haakon J. & Molnár, Peter & Ringdal, Martin, 2016. "Implied volatility index for the Norwegian equity market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 133-141.
    14. Birru, Justin & Figlewski, Stephen, 2012. "Anatomy of a meltdown: The risk neutral density for the S&P 500 in the fall of 2008," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 151-180.

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