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Growth, Consumption and Knowledge Cities


  • Riccardo Cappellin

    () (University of Rome - Tor Vergata)


Cities are important centres of service activities and hubs of new knowledge. The changing structure of production and consumption in post-industrial cities has been analysed by building on the recent economic literature in three related fields, such as: the ‘endogenous development’ of industrial clusters, the regional development of knowledge intensive business services and the regional factors of innovation and knowledge creation. The increasing interaction between users and producers for the development of new services within cities creates the internal aggregate demand, which is mainly concentrated within cities, and can be a powerful driver of national growth and the new motor or the drivers of the economy in a modern city.

Suggested Citation

  • Riccardo Cappellin, 2011. "Growth, Consumption and Knowledge Cities," Symphonya. Emerging Issues in Management, University of Milano-Bicocca, issue 2 Global , pages 6-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:sym:journl:164:y:2011:i:2

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gallouj, Faiz & Weinstein, Olivier, 1997. "Innovation in services," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4-5), pages 537-556, December.
    2. Leonardo Becchetti & Alessandra Pelloni & Fiammetta Rossetti, 2008. "Relational Goods, Sociability, and Happiness," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 343-363, August.
    3. Jan Fagerberg, 2003. "Innovation: A Guide to the Literature," Working Papers on Innovation Studies 20031012, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
    4. Faïz Gallouj, 2002. "Innovation in the service economy: the new wealth of nations," Post-Print halshs-00198409, HAL.
    5. Simone Strambach, 2010. "Knowledge-Intensive Business Services (KIBS)," Chapters,in: Platforms of Innovation, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Riccardo Cappellin & Rüdiger Wink, 2009. "International Knowledge and Innovation Networks," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13503.
    7. Roberta Capello, 1999. "Spatial Transfer of Knowledge in High Technology Milieux: Learning Versus Collective Learning Processes," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 353-365.
    8. Riccardo Cappellin, 2010. "The Governance of Regional Knowledge Networks," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2010(3), pages 5-41.
    9. Peter Wood, 2006. "Urban Development and Knowledge-Intensive Business Services: Too Many Unanswered Questions?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(3), pages 335-361.
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    Cited by:

    1. Riccardo Cappellin, 2016. "Investments, balance of payment equilibrium and a new industrial policy in Europe," ERSA conference papers ersa16p931, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Nicola Bellini & Jukka Teras & Hakan Ylinenpaa, 2012. "Science and Technology Parks in the Age of Open Innovation. The Finnish Case," Symphonya. Emerging Issues in Management, University of Milano-Bicocca, issue 1 Innovat, pages 25-44.
    3. Riccardo Cappellin, 2016. "Innovation and investments in a regional cross-sectoral growth model: A change is needed in European cohesion policies," ERSA conference papers ersa16p991, European Regional Science Association.


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