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Estimating the wage costs of inter- and intra- sectoral adjustment

Author

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  • Michelle Haynes
  • Richard Upward
  • Peter Wright

Abstract

The proposition that labour market adjustments to intra-industry trade are less costly than adjustments to inter-industry trade is a widely-held belief amongst trade economists. If it is the case that there are significant sector-specific skills, then this ‘smooth adjustment hypothesis’ seems intuitive. However, direct evidence relating to this issue remains largely anecdotal. In this Paper we adopt the methodology of the micro-econometric labour literature to estimate the returns to tenure within firms, industries and occupations in order to predict the costs, in terms of wage losses, of moving jobs between and within sectors. To do this we use a large panel of individual workers for the UK over a long period (1975–1998), which enables us to control for unobserved fixed effects which may jointly determine the propensity to move jobs and the wage level.
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Suggested Citation

  • Michelle Haynes & Richard Upward & Peter Wright, 2002. "Estimating the wage costs of inter- and intra- sectoral adjustment," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 138(2), pages 229-253, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:weltar:v:138:y:2002:i:2:p:229-253 DOI: 10.1007/BF02707743
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Joseph G. Altonji & Nicolas Williams, 2005. "Do Wages Rise with Job Seniority? A Reassessment," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(3), pages 370-397, April.
    10. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    11. Jacobson, Louis S & LaLonde, Robert J & Sullivan, Daniel G, 1993. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 685-709.
    12. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
    13. Lori G. Kletzer, 1998. "Job Displacement," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 115-136, Winter.
    14. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marius Brülhart & Robert J. R. Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2006. "Intra-Industry Trade and Labour-Market Adjustment: A Reassessment Using Data on Individual Workers," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(3), pages 521-545, October.
    2. Robert J. R. Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2006. "Skill Specificity And Labour Mobility: Occupational And Sectoral Dimensions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 74(3), pages 389-413, June.
    3. Gudrun Biffl, 2003. "The Role of Migrants in the Production of Tradeables and Non-tradables. The Case of Austria," WIFO Working Papers 194, WIFO.
    4. Saeed Rasekhi & Saman Ghaderi, 2013. "Marginal Intra-Industry Trade and Employment Reallocation: The Case Study of Iran’s Manufacturing Industries," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 417-429, September.
    5. Abdul Azhar & Robert Elliott, 2011. "A Measure of Trade Induced Adjustment in Volume and Quality Space," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(5), pages 955-968, November.
    6. Abdul Azhar & Robert Elliott, 2003. "On the measurement of trade-induced adjustment," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), pages 419-439.
    7. Tsou, Meng-Wen & Liu, Jin-Tan & Hammitt, James K. & Chang, Ching-Fu, 2013. "The impact of foreign direct investment in China on employment adjustments in Taiwan: Evidence from matched employer–employee data," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25, pages 68-79.
    8. Manuel Cabral & Joana Silva, 2006. "Intra-Industry Trade Expansion and Employment Reallocation between Sectors and Occupations," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 142(3), pages 496-520, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    J24; J31; J41;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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