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Interregional transfers: A political-economy CGE approach

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  • Nicolaas Groenewold
  • Alfred Hagger
  • John Madden

Abstract

We model the effects of changes in a federal government’s inter-regional transfers within the context of a CGE model of a federal system in which regional governments act to maximise the welfare of the residents of their region subject to the effects of their decision on regional economic outcomes. Regional governments are modelled as players in a non-cooperative game. Simulations are conducted with six versions of a small two-region model, each calibrated for a particular Australian state and the rest of the nation. We show that a change in the level of transfers has little influence on per-capita private consumption, government consumption and welfare, and that its main effect is to induce migration from the donor region to the recipient region. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Nicolaas Groenewold & Alfred Hagger & John Madden, 2003. "Interregional transfers: A political-economy CGE approach," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 82(4), pages 535-554, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:82:y:2003:i:4:p:535-554 DOI: 10.1007/s10110-003-0191-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laussel, Didier & Le Breton, Michel, 1998. "Existence of Nash equilibria in fiscal competition models," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 283-296, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2013. "The national and regional effects of fiscal decentralisation in China," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(3), pages 731-760, December.
    2. Luque, Carlos A. & Haddad, Eduardo A. & Lima, Gilberto T. & Sakurai, Sergio N. & Costa, Silvio M., 2011. "Impact assessment of interregional government transfers in Brazil: an input-output approach," MPRA Paper 31292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Glyn Wittwer & Mark Horridge, 2010. "Bringing Regional Detail to a CGE Model using Census Data," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 229-255.
    4. Lecca, Patrizio & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim, 2010. "Balanced Budget Government Spending in a Small Open Regional Economy," SIRE Discussion Papers 2010-68, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    5. Giesecke, James A. & Madden, John R., 2013. "Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, Elsevier.
    6. André, Francisco J. & Cardenete, M. Alejandro, 2009. "Defining efficient policies in a general equilibrium model: a multi-objective approach," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 192-200, September.
    7. Mardones D., Cristián, 2012. "Chile: building a computable general equilibrium model with an application to the Bío Bío region," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), April.
    8. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2011. "Regional Equality and National Development in China: Is There a Trade‐Off?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(4), pages 628-669, December.
    9. Nicolaas Groenewold & Alfred Hagger, 2007. "Regional Unemployment Disparities: An Evaluation of Policy Measures," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 07-05, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    10. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.
    11. Anping Chen & Nicolaas Groenewold, 2014. "The regional economic effects of a reduction in carbon emissions and an evaluation of offsetting policies in China," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, pages 429-453.

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