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Mining nationalization and privatization in Peru and in Chile

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  • Gustavo Lagos

    (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)

Abstract

The nationalization process of mining companies was a global issue from the beginning of the twentieth century. It first occurred in Europe for diverse reasons and at the end of the 1940s, it reached developing countries. The cause for nationalization in the latter was dominated by the search to recover a national patrimony and to regain sovereignty in countries where mining weighed too much economically compared to other activities. Transnational corporations generated so much of exports, taxes, and GDP in these countries that governments had very little room for devising national policies. The future of countries was decided in the secret of foreign board rooms of these companies, without consultation to national governments. Nationalization was also driven by the belief that by managing mining resources, the countries would accelerate economic development. Peru and Chile, indisputable leaders in mine production, experienced nationalization at the end of the 1960s and beginning of the 1970s, but the outcome was very different in each country. This paper explores the successes and failures of mining nationalization in Peru and Chile, and how the outcomes influenced mining policy during the following decades.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavo Lagos, 2018. "Mining nationalization and privatization in Peru and in Chile," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 31(1), pages 127-139, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s13563-017-0124-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-017-0124-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2011. "Natural Resources: Curse or Blessing?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(2), pages 366-420, June.
    2. Frankel, Jeffrey A., 2010. "The Natural Resource Curse: A Survey," Scholarly Articles 4454156, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
    3. Germà Bel, 2010. "Against the mainstream: Nazi privatization in 1930s Germany1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 34-55, February.
    4. Carlos Contreras & Marina Zuloaga, 2014. "Historia Mínima del Perú," Libros no PUCP / Books other publishers, Otras editoriales / Other publishers, edition 1, number otr-2014-03, Septembri.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gunton, Cameron & Gunton, Thomas & Batson, Joshua & Markey, Sean & Dale, Daniel, 2021. "Designing fiscal regimes for impact benefit agreements," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
    2. Philip Maxwell & Mauricio Mora, 2020. "Lithium and Chile: looking back and looking forward," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 33(1), pages 57-71, July.
    3. Gregory, Gillian H., 2021. "Rendering mine closure governable and constraints to inclusive development in the Andean region," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).

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